Sport Therapy* BSc (Hons)

Full-time undergraduate (3 years)

Cambridge

September 2019


*This course will start in September 2019, subject to validation.

Overview

Immerse yourself in the world of sport, exercise, injury and rehabilitation. Get hands-on experience in our accredited labs in Cambridge, and graduate ready to work as a professional sport therapist.

Full description

Careers

You'll graduate as a healthcare professional from a course accredited by the Society of Sport Therapists.

Sports therapy professionals are increasingly in demand in the performance sport, recreational sport and healthcare industries. They can work for teams or organisations, or be self-employed. You could pursue a career in a sports medicine team, supporting professional players back from injury. Or you might choose to work with the increasing number of 'weekend warriors' and recreational athletes, who also need support to recover from injury. Alternatively, you could focus on working with the wider community – perhaps those who are inactive or older, and need assistance to get back to functional fitness.

While you're studying at ARU, we'll encourage you to make connections with industry. We have links with a range of sporting organisations, such as:

  • Living Sport (Cambridge and Peterborough Sports Development)
  • Cambridge City Council
  • Addenbrooke's Hospital
  • British Paralympic Association
  • Cambridge Utd FC
  • British Cycling
  • England & Wales Cricket Board.

When you first register as a student, you'll become a member of the Society of Sport Therapists, which provides guidance and advice for the profession. Our course will also signpost opportunities to gain wider qualifications, such as REPS (Register of Exercise Professionals) courses, to strengthen your CV.

Postgraduate study and research

Graduation doesn’t need to be the end of your time with us. If you’d like to continue your studies we offer a wide range of full-time and part-time postgraduate courses, including MSc Sport and Exercise Science as well as PhD opportunities.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules

  • Anatomy and Physiology
    You will explore the fundamental aspects of human anatomy and physiology in order to understand how the body responds and performs to physical activity. You will look at how the regulation of the human body to stress (exercise) relates to an intricate set of homeostatic events, enabling different systems to increase their overall physiological output to sustain effort. The structure and function of the main organ systems in the body; the musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular and digestive systems will be examined and reviewed in relation to rest and in response to exercise. You will study and explore the content through lectures, seminars and laboratory based practicals where the functional and homeostatic principles will be applied and examined under changing conditions. As well as providing you with subject specific knowledge, this module will enable you to develop a number of specific employability skills related to practical (laboratory) techniques and general skills related to data collection, data handling and data presentation.
  • Introduction to Human Movement
    You will be introduced to the fundamentals of human movement using a concept of qualitative movement diagnosis (QMD). QMD is an observational approach to analysing human movement, a key skill which is fundamental to all Sports Coaching, Sport Science, Health and Exercise and Physical Education practitioners. You will also study the types of motion a body can have, including the concepts of distance, speed and time and displacement, velocity and acceleration. These kinematic motion quantities will be explored practically and graphically. The importance of Newton's laws and the net external force to all movement will be explained, giving you an insight into how limb rotation can produce translational movement. The anatomical quantities of mass, weight and centre of mass will be investigated and the links drawn with the body's kinetic and potential energy. You will study and explore the content within the context of real sporting actions such as: standing, walking, running, jumping and throwing and by using the techniques of video analysis, experimental investigation and computer aided data analysis.
  • Exercise Physiology and Nutrition
    Energy is essential for the functioning of the body and is in strong demand during exercise. You will explore the biochemical processes involved in energy transfer (metabolism) and will examine the different energy production pathways under aerobic and anaerobic conditions – and extend this understanding to identify the continuum of energy supply and demand during differing modes of exercise. Additionally, the role and contribution of the various macro-nutrients as fuel for the metabolism will be discussed. Energy expenditure during rest and physical activity will also be investigated. As a result you will examine how oxygen consumption can give us a reliable insight into our energy expenditure and the different fuel and energy systems used. In this module you will learn through lectures, seminars and laboratory based practicals where the physiological and metabolic principles will be applied and examined under both resting and exercise conditions. As well as providing you with subject specific knowledge, this module will enable you to develop a number of specific employability skills related to practical (laboratory) techniques and general skills related to data collection, data handling and data presentation.

Year two, core modules

  • Physiological Profiling for Endurance
    Aerobic physiology and functioning are the linchpins to all athletic and health-based activities. You will study the process of profiling aerobic endurance performance and health from a physiological and analytical perspective, looking at validity and reliability in test selection. You will consider the protocols and limitations associated with the assessment of maximum aerobic power (VO2max), while aerobic capacity will be addressed in the context of maximal lactate steady state, lactate minimum, individual anaerobic threshold, onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA) and DMax and the ventilatory threshold. The relevance of performance economy as a diagnostic tool will be considered and projected to show how this simple concept of sub-maximal oxygen uptake can be used to establish the performance indicator termed velocity at VO2max (vVO2max). Consideration will be given to the dynamics of oxygen supply and utilisation at the onset of exercise through a reflection of oxygen uptake kinetics. These concepts will all be used to explore exercise intensity domains and how the role of critical power and the W’ can be used to provide an objective measure of an integrated response to exercise. Clinical skills will also be considered through the application of such techniques as ECG, thoracic impedance, respiratory flow loops and cardiopulmonary exercise testing.
  • Physiological Profiling for Strength and Power
    The production of force and power across a range of motion, and in conjunction with the body dimensions, are crucial to both everyday living and athletic performance. You will study the process of profiling aerobic endurance performance and health from a physiological and analytical perspective, looking at validity and reliability in test selection. You will assess anaerobic power through such means as the Wingate cycle test and Margaria Stair test while anaerobic capacity will be evaluated in the context of accumulated oxygen deficit tests as well as lactate and constant load tests. The determination of strength will address measures of isometric, isotonic and isoinertial force production using conventional ‘gym-based’ approaches to more clinically relevant measures such as the Reactive Strength Index. These will be compared to the laboratory controlled assessment of strength (torque) using isokinetic dynamometry. Body composition will be considered through the use of both callipers and skinfold assessments through to hydro-densitometry. Flexibility and the determination of range of motion (ROM) will then be considered in the context of indirect measures such as Sit-and-Reach through to more applied approaches using flexometers and goniometers.
  • Strength and Conditioning
    This role of the applied strength and conditioning (S&C) coach at all levels of sport has progressed in recent years and is now a fundamental role within the sport science support team. You will explore safe and effective S&C practice and develop an evidence based applied rationale for the role of S&C work in relation to different performance athletes. You will be introduced to the fundamental techniques and principles of athlete assessment, evaluation and consultation, considering these applied modes in conjunction with a recognition of the use of an athlete needs analysis. Although the generic term “S&C” is applied to this training domain you will address the wider implications in relation to the components of fitness: endurance, speed, strength, agility (or equivalent areas). You will also explore the rationale for approaches used in relation to training programme design which will be under-scored by the issues of physiological and anatomical adaptation.

Year three, core modules

  • Research Project
    This module enables students to carry out an individual piece of research in the civil engineering field which will require a literature review of current knowledge in the chosen topic area, the formulation of a research question and the collection of primary data by experimentation and modelling. Advice will be given by civil engineering staff on choosing a research topic in a briefing session delivered towards the end of the academic year prior to that in which the student undertakes their dissertation.
  • Advanced Strength and Conditioning
    Investigate the latest evidence based practice on Strength and Conditioning (S&C). Learn, experience and analyse free weight lifting techniques with specific focus on more complex lifts and the derivatives associated with them. You will learn to coach performers through this process and also consider the value (of these lifts) within the training cycle. Through observation of performers, you will understand the coaching cues in order to identify ineffective movement patterns. You will also develop a high level of knowledge to enable you to practically suggest and present appropriate interventions for a performer of varying ability. The use of technology/micro technology for monitoring performance will be investigated and you will review the value of this method of data collection for the exercise and conditioning professional. You will investigate how training may change when working with different performers with varying abilities. Being able to change your professional practice relative to the specific population you are working with is a critical skill for the conditioning coach. Learning about the needs and issues to consider when training special populations will permit you to be a more proficient in the area.

Assessment

Throughout the course, we’ll use a range of assessment methods to help you measure your progress. These include presentations, practical skills tests, scientific reports, case study critiques, online assessments and a research project.

We’ll also encourage you to reflect on your work, and participate in peer assessment.

Where you'll study

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate. 

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Where can I study?

Cambridge
Lord Ashcroft Building on our Cambridge campus

Our campus is close to the centre of Cambridge, often described as the perfect student city.

Explore our Cambridge campus

Fees & funding

How do I pay my fees?

Tuition fee loan

Most English undergraduates take out a tuition fee loan with Student Finance England. The fees are then paid directly to us. The amount you repay each month is linked to your salary and repayments start in April after you graduate.

How to apply for a tuition fee loan

Paying upfront

If you choose not to take out a loan you can pay your fees directly to us. There are two ways to do this: either pay in full, or through a three- or six-month instalment plan starting at registration.

How to pay your fees directly

International students

You must pay your fees up-front, in full or in instalments. You will also be asked for a deposit or sponsorship letter for undergraduate courses. Details will be in your offer letter.

Paying your fees

Funding for UK & EU students

Most new undergraduate students can apply for government funding to support their studies and university life. This includes Tuition Fee Loans and Maintenance Loans. There are additional grants available for specific groups of students, such as those with disabilities or dependants.

We also offer a fantastic range of ARU scholarships, which provide extra financial support while you’re at university. Find out more about eligibility and how to apply.

From September 2018, EU students starting an undergraduate degree with us can access an £800 bursary.

Funding for international students

We offer a number of scholarships, as well as an early payment discount. Explore your options:

Entry requirements

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  • 112 UCAS points from a minimum of 2 A Levels (or equivalent), including a pass in Psychology, Physical Education, Sports Studies or a science subject.
  • 3 GCSEs at grade C, or grade 4, or above including English, Maths and Science.
  • If English is not your first language you will be expected to demonstrate a certificated level of proficiency of at least IELTS 6.0 (Academic level) or equivalent English Language qualification, as recognised by Anglia Ruskin University.
International students

We welcome applications from international and EU students, and accept a range of international qualifications.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you'll need to make sure you meet our English language requirements for undergraduate courses.

Improving your English language skills

If you don't meet our English language requirements, we offer a range of courses which could help you achieve the level required for entry onto a degree course.

We also provide our own English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT) in the UK and overseas. To find out if we are planning to hold an ELPT in your country, contact our country managers.

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