#TuesdayTip: managing all those pdfs

Research and Innovation Development Office

Category: #tuesdaytip

22 November 2016

Whatever stage of your research career you're at, you'll be downloading and reading dozens of journal articles, book chapters and letters every week.

You may have your own systems for managing these, but if it's becoming overwhelming don't despair! A few really useful software packages can help.

Whatever stage of your research career you're at, you'll be downloading and reading dozens of journal articles, book chapters and letters every week. You may have your own systems for managing these, but if it's becoming overwhelming don't despair! A few really useful software packages can help.

EndNote is perhaps the most widely known of this sort of tool, but it faces competition from Papers and Mendeley. At their most simple level, these tools act like an iTunes for articles: you use them to search for publications from the web, and then as a reader through which to peruse the content. With the help of metadata, the libraries you create will include DOI numbers, and all the necessary information to cite a paper in your work. You can usually annotate and highlight content within the reader, giving you a one-stop shop for handling the info.

Perhaps the most helpful feature of these packages is the ability to create citations directly from the software. You're able to export all or some of your downloaded papers into an easily-used format for citation in your work. For example, if you write in LaTeX, you can easily create a BibTeX library through Mendeley or Papers, making bibliography creation just a click of a mouse.

Hope this helps!

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