Aimee Neaverson

Lecturer, Criminology

Faculty:Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences

Department:Department of Humanities and Social Sciences

Location: Cambridge

Areas of Expertise: Criminology

Courses taught: Criminology, Criminology and Sociology, Psychology and Criminology

Aimee is a criminologist whose research interests lie in developmental criminology, youth justice and specifically studying protective factors and the development of youth aggression.

Background

Aimee joined Anglia Ruskin University in October 2016 after working as the B.A. (Hons) Criminology Degree course leader and lecturer at University Centre Peterborough since 2010. Aimee has experience teaching Criminology at the UK HEI level as well as the Canadian HEI level since 2005. Aimee has taught on a variety of modules including Criminal Justice, Theories of Deviance, Violent Crime, Youth Justice, Trials and Errors and Comparative Criminal Justice.

Prior to starting her lecturing position in the UK in 2010, Aimee worked at a high secure unit for adolescent females. Before moving to England, Aimee completed her Master's Degree in Criminology at Simon Fraser University in 2010 with a focus on young offenders, child abuse, child safeguarding, and youth deviance. Specifically, her focus was a quantitative examination of the effects of early childhood maltreatment on later adolescent years with regards to increased levels of aggression and vulnerability to victimization. Aimee has experience conducting research pertaining to youth crime prevention through social control, cognitive behavioural therapy, and interviewing young offenders while in custody as a means to identify risk factors for future offending. Aimee also has experience conducting researching using both Qualitative and Quantitative design.

Currently, Aimee is finishing her PhD at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, entitled The Examination of Protective Factors between Corporal Punishment and Subsequent Aggression. Aimee was awarded the Wakefield Scholarship in 2013, 2014 and 2015, which fully funded her PhD. This research seeks to identify reasons why some people do not become aggressive, even when they have been exposed to well established risk factors. Aimee's research examines various protective factors that decrease the chances of a young person developing adolescent aggression after having being exposed to corporal punishment.

Research interests

  • Developmental Criminology
  • Evidence Based Interventions
  • Quantitative Research Methods
  • Youth Justice
  • Child Abuse
  • Family Violence
  • Crime Prevention
  • Youth Aggression
  • Protective Factors
  • Cycle of Violence

Areas of research supervision

  • Developmental Criminology
  • Evidence Based Interventions
  • Quantitative Research Methods
  • Youth Justice
  • Child Abuse
  • Family Violence
  • Crime Prevention
  • Youth Aggression
  • Protective Factors
  • Cycle of Violence

Teaching

Current modules taught:

  • Trials and Errors: Justice in the Court
  • Criminal Justice in England and Wales

Qualifications

  • PhD Criminology, University of Cambridge (in progress)
  • PG Cert, Anglia Ruskin University (2018)
  • DTLLS, Anglia Ruskin University  (2013)
  • M.A. Criminology, Simon Fraser University, Canada (2010)
  • B.A. (Hons) Criminology, Saint Mary’s University, Canada (2008)

Research Scholarships

  • 2015 Wakefield Scholar, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge
  • 2014 Wakefield Scholar, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge
  • 2013 Wakefield Scholar, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge

Recent presentations and conferences

Neaverson, Aimee E. (2009) Institutional Youth Victimization: A Critical Approach to Government Commissioned Inquiries to Victimization in Youth Detention Facilities. Presented at the Western Society of Criminology Annual Conference, San Diego, February 2009.