Impact of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) gene inhibition with IGF II antisense oligomer during the development of rat hepatocarcinogenesis

10 January 2018, 12:00 - 14:00
Chelmsford campus

ARITI is delighted to welcome our new Visiting Research Fellow colleague, Dr Miltu Kumar Ghosh. Dr Ghosh’s presentation followed by a Q&A session will take place 12-1pm. Lunch and networking will take place 1-2pm.

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a multistep complex process, caused by many of genetic alteration. Insulin-like growth factors and their receptor have been widely implicated to HCC. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a mitogenic polypeptide, found in various fetal and neonatal tissues of humans and rats and expresses in HCC. At the NSHM Knowledge Campus, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, Kolkata, India, we investigated anticancer potential of phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) against three coding exons (exon-1/exon-2/ exon-3) of IGF-II messenger ribonucleic acid in rat hepatocarcinogenesis model. During diethylnitrosamine and 2-acetylaminofluorene induced hepatocarcinogenesis, rats were treated with ASOs. Various biochemical and histological studies were conducted. About 40% of carcinogen treated rats, which received two oligomers (against exon-1 or-3) did not show any hepatic lesion, hyperplastic nodule or tumor and remaining 60% of those rats showed lesion incidence and had about 59% and 55% reductions in the numbers of hepatic altered foci, respectively. Reductions in the total lesion-area when compared with carcinogen control rats were 64% and 53%, respectively for the animals treated with carcinogen and received the ASOs against exon-1/-3. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled ASO reached in the hepatocytes in 2 h. No predominant IGF-II overexpression was observed in case of rats treated with the two ASOs. Treatment of the antisense IGF-II oligomers in carcinogen treated rats show better hepatocellular integrity along with several preneoplastic/neoplastic marker isoenzyme/enzyme modulations. Two of the three antisense oligomer-types effectively controlled IGF-II overexpression, causing the delay of the development and/or progress of hepatic cancer in rats. Our research was performed within the legal and ethical requirements in the Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, Kolkata, India.

Biography

Dr Miltu Kumar Ghosh is an Assistant Professor, at NSHM Knowledge Campus, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, Kolkata, India. His research interests and expertise are in hepatocellular carcinoma and targeted drug delivery. In particular, he is interested to find out the impact of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) gene inhibition with IGF II antisense oligomer during the development of rat hepatocarcinogenesis.

Event Details

When:
10 January 2018, 12:00 - 14:00
Location:
Chelmsford campus
Room:
SAW301
Cost:
Free to attend - lunch is provided