Sports Coaching and Physical Education with Foundation Year BSc (Hons)

Full-time undergraduate (4 years)

Cambridge

September 2017

Intermediate awards: BSc (without honours), CertHE, DipHE

Overview

Sports coaches instruct, train and direct athletes or teams, managing skills development in order to achieve a specific goal. Our innovative degree combines a scientific approach to coaching with hands-on experience, with a foundation year that will build your scientific knowledge.

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Your course will have a new home in Compass House, which will extend our campus along East Road. You’ll have the latest technology at your fingertips and be able to collaborate with other students on innovative projects to hone your skills.

Full description

Careers

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Our course is designed for people who want to become sports coaches. However, you might also choose to use it as a springboard into a range of other careers, including:

  • sports development officer
  • strength and conditioning coach
  • performance analyst
  • physical education teacher
  • primary school teacher
  • schools sports co-ordinator (SSCo)
  • further education sports co-ordinator (FESCo)
  • military officer or physical training instructor
  • lecturer in higher education.

While studying, you could become a student member of Sports Coach UK. And, if you wish to follow a career in performance analysis, you’ll have the opportunity to be accredited by the International Society of Performance Analysis of Sport.

We have strong links with local school sports co-ordinators, sports development officers, various rugby, soccer, hockey, netball and basketball teams, and several academies in the region. 

You’ll also be encouraged to make the most of our links with a wide range of sporting organisations, including:

  • Living Sport
  • British Paralympic Association
  • British Cycling
  • European Judo Union
  • International Association of Judo Researchers
  • American College of Sports Medicine
  • England & Wales Cricket Board.

Graduation doesn’t need to be the end of your time with us. If you'd like to continue your studies we offer a wide range of full-time and part-time postgraduate courses, including MSc Sport and Exercise Science.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules

  • Physiology
    Physiology is the science of body function and is related to the structure, or anatomy, or the organism. In this module the main organ and regulatory systems that work to enable the body to function and respond to change, whilst maintaining a constant internal environment, will be studied. Although this module will focus mainly on the human body as an example of a much studied organism, reference to other organisms will be made to illustrate particular principles or to contrast different systems and mechanisms. Laboratory-based practicals and workshops will be used to build on the knowledge gained from the lectures. The practical sessions will enable the development of a range of laboratory-based skills, which will include the recording of observational findings as well as experimental results.
  • Chemical Principles
    This module provides an elementary introduction to chemical science for those with little or no prior experience of the subject. The study of materials and the undergoing chemical changes will be discussed. These principles will then be developed further by exploring the periodic table, chemical equations, calculating concentrations, quantitative chemical analysis such as colorimetry, chemical equilibria and organic chemistry. The practical component of the course will allow you to gain practice in some basic laboratory techniques based on the concepts covered in the lectures. In addition, tutorials will be held for students to practice questions further that arise from the relevant lectures. Laboratory experience and exposure will also equip students with required transferable skills. The focus will also be on good laboratory practice and sustainable approaches to chemistry.
  • Mathematics for Science
    Foundation Maths for Science is a course that ensures students on the extended programmes for degrees in the departments of Life Sciences, Biomedical and Forensic Sciences, and Vision and Hearing Sciences have the necessary basic mathematical skills required for entry to level 4. By the end of this module, students will be able to carry out the basic mathematical manipulations and understand the relevant key concepts required in order to progress to their chosen degree course. Each mathematical concept is introduced by a lecture, in which examples of how to use and apply the concept are demonstrated. Students practise problems in a tutorial for each topic, using worksheets given out in advance of the sessions. The worksheets include problems applied to the various degree pathways to which the students will progress, to indicate the importance and applicability of mathematics to their future degrees. The subjects covered are a range of arithmetic skills, algebra, areas and volumes, trigonometry and basic statistics. In addition, there are sessions using Excel for manipulation of simple data sets using formulae and graphical presentation of the results. Students will be expected to apply the skills learnt in graphically presenting data to the other modules they are studying where applicable.
  • Biomolecules
    In this module you will focus on water and carbon and their central importance to biology. The composition, structure and function of the four groups of macromolecules - proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids and lipids - will be studied. A specific focus will be the mechanism of action of enzymes and factors such as pH and temperature that affect their function. The lectures will be complemented by practicals that build on the lecture material and teach a range of laboratory skills. The module will also focus on developing the academic skills required to be successful in higher education, particularly independent study, understanding the different forms of scientific writing (for example, practical reports and essays). Other skills taught will include finding reliable sources of information, citation and referencing and avoiding poor academic practice and plagiarism.
  • Physical Principles
    This module provides an introduction to the principles and laws of physics which underpin all life sciences. No prior knowledge of physics is assumed, and the focus will be on those aspects which are specific to the requirements of students in their future pathways. The module will be taught with a mixture of lectures, workshops, tutorials and laboratory practicals. The module will encompass aspects such as how organisms move in relation to their environment, how they perceive their environment in terms of light and sound, how the physics of fluids and gasses affect the anatomy and physiology of organisms, how electricity is used to allow communication, and finally how radioactivity impacts on organisms, and the applications of physics in modern medicine The practical component of this module will allow the students to develop an understanding of how the theory they are taught in lectures is applied in practical situations. This module will allow the students to progress to their next level of study with a thorough grounding in aspects that are often considered to be challenging, but when understood, allow the students to appreciate fully how organisms interact with their environment, as determined by the fundamental laws of physics and chemistry.
  • Biology of Cells
    In this module practical sessions on cellular respiration, osmosis and cell diversity will support your lectures. You will study the structure and function of cellular organelles, membranes and transport systems, in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In addition, cell metabolism - the biochemical processes undertaken in living organisms - is a key component of this module. You will also cover Cellular respiration of glucose and the role of mitochondria. The fundamental principle of biology, the ability to renew (cells) and reproduce, both sexually and asexually and the mechanisms of cell division, including mitosis and meiosis, will be also be covered.

Year two, core modules

  • Anatomy for Motion
    This module will introduce you to the biomechanics of human movement, with the analysis of human performance in sport from the mechanical point of view. You’ll get a sound grounding in the fundamentals of human movement for Coaching Science and Sport, Health and Exercise and learn the essentials for further study in Biomechanics. We’ll study and explore the content within the context of real sporting actions such as: standing, walking, running, jumping and throwing and by using the techniques of video analysis, experimental investigation and computer aided data analysis. You’ll develop transferable skills such as IT, numeracy and communication and we’ll encourage you to become an independent thinker with good study habits. Your learning will be assessed by coursework and a final examination.
  • Exercise Physiology
    You’ll be introduced to the fundamental aspects of human physiology in order to understand how the body performs and responds to physical activity. You’ll explore the structure and function of the main organ systems of the body; the musculoskeletal, nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive and urinary systems. You’ll examine how these systems work together and how they respond to exercise. Energy is essential for the functioning of the body and is in strong demand during exercise. Therefore you’ll explore the biochemical processes involved in energy transfer (metabolism). You’ll examine the different energy production pathways under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Also, the role and contribution of the various macro-nutrients as fuel for the metabolism will be discussed. Then, energy expenditure during rest and physical activity will be investigated. You’ll examine how oxygen consumption can give us an insight into our energy expenditure and the different fuel and energy systems used. In your module you’ll study and explore the content through lectures, seminars and laboratory based practicals where the physiological and metabolic principles are applied and examined under both resting and exercise conditions. As well as providing you with subject specific knowledge, our module will enable you to develop a number of transferable skills, including practical (laboratory) techniques and general skills relevant to employment including report writing, data collection, data handling and data presentation. You’ll be assessed by coursework (60%) and exam (40%). Standard texts are available via the library and the more specialist literature is online.
  • Research Methods for Sport and Exercise
    Gain an introduction to the core skills required for research and study in sport science and sports coaching in a higher education environment. You’ll develop skills and attributes to initiate an understanding of the research process and stages associated with it and also an appreciation of different types of research. You'll develop an understanding of the different types of data that can be collected within your course area and you’ll develop a good awareness of the data analysis process, utilising different IT skills and IT programs. You’ll develop key employability skills throughout the module, for example, how to construct oral and written reports using appropriate formatting, language and citations.
  • Sport and Exercise Psychology
    Understanding psychological aspects of sport and exercise is vital in enhancing, or inhibiting, sports performance and exercise participation. This could include pre-competition nerves, attention control, self-confidence and motivation. You’ll reflect upon your own experiences in relation to psychological factors and to consider psychological demands of different sports and levels of participation. You’ll use your classroom time to take part in discussion and analysis of specific key topic areas of sport and exercise psychology and take part in group and individual tasks.

Year three, core modules

  • Sport Development (option 1)
    Learn about sports development processes from around the world, within a variety of socio-economic and educational contexts, and how these are shaped by government policies. You’ll consider main bodies which influence the development and management of sport and focus on the ways in which sport functions as a business. As you focus on complexities of sports development and compare them to sports structures and funding from around the world, you’ll look at how sport in the UK is constructed and governed. Finally, you’ll research the recruitment, development and funding of athletes across various levels of performance from playground to podium and use case studies from around the world.
  • Performance Analysis
    Whilst sports biomechanics is concerned with understanding the fine detail of movement during an individual’s performance of a particular technique, performance analysts are more concerned with gross movements, or movement patterns in games or team sports. Performance analysts are also more concerned with strategic and tactical issues in sport, rather than with technique analysis. This module examines how such analyses can be applied to a variety of coaching environments in order for you to monitor, analyse, diagnose and prescribe feedback and actions to enhance the learning and performance of the component elements of sport. The ability to objectively analyse both the performer's needs and the coaching process are key elements of good professional practice. You'll develop an integrated approach to performance analysis and gain a broader understanding of the conceptual frameworks underpinning movement at all levels of sports performance. You'll develop key transferable skills including communication, analytical and the ability to present information in a variety of formats.
  • Research Methods and Project Preparation for Sport and Exercise
    Build on experience you gained from previous modules and develop skills and knowledge base to produce a research project. Deliver it via assessment, presentation and written reports. Focus on advanced data handling and analysis of data and critically analysis and discuss reliability within data. You’ll produce a research proposal related to your chosen course and get constant support from our academics through tutorials, lectures and practicals.
  • Applied Coaching
    This module will put theory into practice, giving you practical experience of planning, delivering and evaluating real life coaching or teaching sessions with the help of a mentor (level 6 student). By the end of the module you’ll have direct coaching/teaching experience and will have generated a portfolio of practical hours of coaching. You’ll develop an appreciation of mentoring, coaching/teaching and reflection, whilst also developing valuable employability skills such as working in a team, communication and professionalism. This module will be particularly beneficial to you if you want to enhance your practical coaching/teaching experience and generate a greater volume of coaching/teaching hours.

Year three, optional modules

  • Biomechanics
    This module is ideal for students who want to specialise in Biomechanics, or add more of a Biomechanical focus to their Sports Coaching and Physical Education degree. It'll build on your learning from 'Anatomy for Motion'. You'll be introduced to the use of force plates for data capture, extend your use of video analysis and integrate new ideas from anthropometrics into your biomechanical analysis. You'll focus on the initiation and development of motion in terms of both the internal torques produced by the musculoskeletal system and the external forces acting. You'll explore the ground reaction force in depth and see how the concepts of internal forces, the external net force and mass and acceleration are used to explain movement patterns, enabling you to appreciate the importance of torque, momentum and impulse and to use these quantities to critically analyse any sporting action. We'll also discuss the mechanical energy considerations of movement in terms of work and power. Finally, you'll investigate projectile behaviour and its importance to sport.
  • Exercise Testing
    There are a range of different tests available to assess physiological performance, the key is choosing the most appropriate. You’ll study the process of profiling performance and health from a physiological and analytical perspective. Your main focus will be the validity and reliability of the tests available to assess aerobic performance, anaerobic performance, strength, power and flexibility. Aerobic assessment will focus on the protocols used for the assessment of maximal aerobic power (VO2max). Analysis will be made of the protocols to assess aerobic capacity, such as maximum lactate steady state, lactate minimum, individual anaerobic threshold, onset of blood lactate accumulation and 4mM turn-point. The role of performance economy will be examined, and projected to show how this simple concept has been used to develop the principle of velocity at VO2max (vVO2max). The concept of critical power and speed will be assessed and justified. The application of these measures to exercise testing and screening will be observed through the study of sub-maximal cardio-pulmonary assessments and the interpretation of Wasserman's 9-plot. You’ll also address the assessment of respiratory function through spirometry and myocardial function through heart variability and electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring. Anaerobic assessment will examine the tests used to assess both power and capacity such as the Wingate cycle test and the Maximally Accumulated Oxygen Deficit (MAOD). Strength and power testing will examine the use of strain gauges, isokinetic dynamometry and gym based protocols. Flexibility assessment will determine the appropriate use of flexometers, goniometers and reach boxes. All of these methodologies will be examined both theoretically and in a laboratory setting. The concepts of validity and reliability will be explored by further examination of statistical methods. As well as providing you with subject specific knowledge, our module helps develop a number of transferable skills including practical (laboratory) techniques and skills relevant to general employment including report writing, data collection, handling and presentation and will be of particular interest to individuals wishing to apply their exercise physiology knowledge and work within a Sports Science Support environment. Standard texts are available via the library and more specialist literature is online. You’ll be assessed by coursework (50%) and exam (50%).
  • Perceptual Motor Skills
    Athletes rely on a constant stream of information from the senses (e.g. vision, audio and proprioception) to execute the skills needed for successful sport performance. This module will initially focus on the processing and the perception of this sensory information. In addition we'll examine how athletes make decisions from this sensory information and how we execute and programme movement. You'll explore topics such as the visual system and get experience with using eye trackers to assess where people look in the environment when playing sport. Also, we'll discuss the influence of factors such as anxiety, expertise and expectancies on the perception of sensory information, anticipation and decision making. The second part of the module will focus on programming human movement, movement coordination and how we can measure performance in the execution of motor skills.
  • Psychological Profiling for Sport
    Many sports performers now employ sport psychologists in preparation for competition. Before an effective sport psychology intervention programme can be designed and delivered a process of athlete assessment, or profiling, must be undertaken. Here, you’ll build on previous modules and specifically focus on profiling/assessment methods and delivering interventions. You’ll learn the principles of assessing a sports performer from a psychological perspective and consider how the findings can be used to develop an intervention. You’ll cover performance issues, profiling tools and interventions, as well as the latest research and case study scenarios and real-life situations. Finally, you’ll profile an individual athlete on his or her psychological needs and develop and teach and intervention programme.
  • Sport and Exercise Nutrition
    You'll gain an integrated overview of human nutrition from both an applied exercise and sports performance aspect. The module begins with an introduction to nutrition for health, including methods of dietary assessment and energy expenditure. You'll be expected to undertake a case study diet evaluation for your first assignment. Additionally, you'll be required to work in 'case study teams to develop evidence-based thinking around how to apply nutritional concepts to real-world cases. This leads to your second assessment involving a team presentation of an individual case study and nutrition programme, with relevance to sport and exercise. You'll also explore the relevance and role of key macronutrients (carbohydrates, fats and proteins) as well as micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) and fluid intake both in terms of health and well-being, and integration from an applied sports perspective. The use of contemporary sports supplementation and ergogenic aids will also be considered in terms of enhancing anaerobic and aerobic performance, with a view to understanding potential mechanisms of action. You'll develop key practical skills throughout this module, culminating in the application of case study interpretation and programme design.

Year four, core modules

  • Long-term Athlete Development
    Long-Term Athlete Development (LTAD) is a structure for athlete development based upon the developmental rather than the chronological age of the athlete; it considers the development of the athlete over a period of years rather than short episodes. Almost all National Governing Bodies (NGBs) have written their own LTAD plan that is sports specific in nature; the information in these plans is often relayed to coaches in short seminars which often do not fully justify complexity of the content. You'll investigate the underlying principles of the LTAD model, considering paediatric physiology, the development of sport in relation to LTAD and the implementation of LTAD across sports. You'll need to consider the physiological, emotional, cognitive and psychological development of children and adolescents. LTAD is a relatively new concept in the UK that has been adopted by almost every sport, studying this module will give you a head start when working with both athletes and school children.
  • Undergraduate Research Project
    In your final year, you have the opportunity to create a substantial piece of individual research, focused on a topic of your choice, which may be based on laboratory work, or a research project based on data in the literature. The project will follow on from the proposal developed in ‘Preparation for Research’. Your project will show evidence of appropriate academic challenge, technical expertise, and progress. You will identify and formulate problems and issues, conduct a literature review, evaluate information, investigate and adopt suitable research methods, and develop approaches for data collection and processing. Regular meetings with your project supervisor will ensure your project is closely monitored and steered in the right direction.
  • Effective and Ethical Coaching
    Our module examines the multi-disciplinary nature of sport. You’ll focus on three areas: learning to mentor, appraising theoretical concepts with peers and finally the appreciation of the interdisciplinary nature of sports coaching and exercise science. Our module permits you the opportunity to work as a mentor to a coach (and/or level 5 student) applying the knowledge you have gained to a practical setting. It also promotes skills important for employment such as communication, application, listening and the expression of ones views supported with literature. You’ll examine the interdisciplinary nature of sport to allow the amalgamation of all areas studied that can then be applied to specific real-life sporting situations. Activities will provide you with the opportunity to analyse particular problems and express solutions with a multi-disciplinary approach. You’ll examine specific ideas, analyse them and then present back the resolution which is an important skill that you'll need in the working world. Our module explores underlying areas of current dispute in the coaching domain and will aid you in your growth and future development.

Year four, optional modules

  • Applied Biomechanics and Kinesiology
    In this module we’ll investigate the biomechanical analysis and evaluation of human movement in sport. You’ll learn to describe the movement pattern of the rotation of the limbs and the linear motion of the body, and explain it in terms of the muscle torques and the external forces that produce the motion. This will give you the skills to make tentative scientific suggestions to athletes on how they may be able to improve their performance. The background theory we’ll cover will continue to develop and deepen your understanding of the concepts of linear Newtonian mechanics as well as rotational dynamics. We’ll also cover the behaviour of the muscles in terms of the production of the torques and analyse the use of EMG. We’ll assess your learning through coursework and your ability to critically analyse human movement.
  • Applied Sports Psychology
    In this module we’ll specifically examine the psychological factors of successful performance and will address issues such as coach-athlete relationships, sport and exercise psychology interventions, coaching behaviour and burnout. You’ll gain the knowledge and skills to successfully prescribe and deliver sport and exercise psychology interventions as a coach or sport scientist. We’ll examine and critique the latest research, and discuss the current knowledge in specific topic areas.
  • Strength and Conditioning
    This role of the applied strength and conditioning coach is continuing to grow in importance. You’ll begin within an in-depth exploration of the body’s anatomy and address the principles of muscle, joint, connective tissue interactions and how locate these through the process of palpation and recognition. With this knowledge you’ll then be able to address the mechanistic principles of strength and performance development. You’ll learn how to work in a safe and effective manner executing appropriate movement patterns in relation to the gross anatomical structures that need to be engaged. Supporting these principles, you’ll develop a scientifically applied rationale for the role of strength and conditioning work in different population groups and also consider how technology can enhance the practice of the professional. You’ll be introduced to the techniques and principles of athlete assessment, evaluation and consultation. You’ll constantly consider endurance, speed, flexibility, agility and power, as well as gaining an in-depth appreciation for the training principles and methodologies and exploring the physiological rationale for these approaches in relation to programme design. You’ll be jointly taught between our staff at Anglia Ruskin and an external strength and conditioning professionals.
  • Scientific Basis of Training
    This module is essentially split into three blocks, all of which are inter-related. The first block deals with the principles of performance components. Within this you'll consider the history of training, where we have come from and where the science is now leading us. You'll also consider what is meant by the term ‘performance’. You'll address the physical demands of athletic events, the event analysis. Here we'll consider the variety of methods that can be adopted to evaluate an athlete in the field and that are regularly used in the literature to inform us as to the physiological and metabolic demands of sport. The second block forms the foundation on which all your understanding will be based, the principles of training design. Within this you'll address and critically evaluate the variables and components of training discussing the use of intensity, frequency, duration and how these help us to establish the key components of training load and volume. This block is very much about you developing a critical appreciation for training programme design. We'll evaluate the models of training considering a number of different proposed theories. Further evaluation will be made of how to structure training programmes. Can we for example use the same approach with elite and novice athletes, team sports and individual sports? You'll consider the differences between peaking and tapering for performance and why some athletes quite simply just miss their window of athletic opportunity. The final block is essentially the backbone to this module, which focuses on the principles of training for speed, strength, flexibility and endurance. Of these it will be endurance training that will be studied the most. The concept of VO2max as a criterion measure of endurance performance will be studied, along with the concept of the lactate turn-point. The lactate turn-point as a performance/training tool will offer up a controversial debate, firstly what does it represent and secondly can it be used to monitor and judge performance. Endurance training will also be extended to consider the often over looked area of anaerobic endurance and the development of the anaerobic capacity. Strength and power will be sub-divided to assess how they each have a role in the make-up of an athlete. These are terms which are interchanged yet require considerably different means of training and as a result produce quite different physiological responses. Speed training is considered in conjunction with these two modes of training. All sporting disciplines require speed to some degree, the key is deciding how best to train this component and as with all of the other modes when to programme it into the annual plan.

BSc Hons Sports Coaching and PE is being revalidated in 2016-17 so modules may be subject to change

Assessment

Throughout the course, we’ll use a range of assessment methods to help you measure your progress. We’ll assess you throughout each year, meaning that we can help you stay on the right track.

You’ll complete exams, practical skills tests, presentations, scientific reports, data-handling exercises, case study critiques, computer assessments and a research project on a topic of interest.

Where you'll study

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate. 

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Where can I study?

Cambridge
Lord Ashcroft Building on our Cambridge campus

Our campus is close to the centre of Cambridge, often described as the perfect student city.

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Fees & funding

Course fees

UK & EU students, 2016/17 (per year)

£9,000

International students, 2016/17 (per year)

£11,000

UK & EU students, 2017/18 (per year)

£9,250

International students, 2017/18 (per year)

£12,200

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For more information about tuition fees, including the UK Government's commitment to EU students, please see our UK/EU funding pages

Additional costs

Trainers, shorts and t-shirts for lab work over lifetime of degree - £100-£200
Cost of printing dissertation/individual project

How do I pay my fees?

You can pay your fees in the following ways.

Tuition fee loan

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Most English undergraduates take out a tuition fee loan with Student Finance England. The fees are then paid directly to us. The amount you repay each month is linked to your salary and repayments start in April after you graduate.

How to apply for a tuition fee loan

Paying upfront

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If you choose not to take out a loan you can pay your fees directly to us. There are two ways to do this: either pay in full, or through a three- or six-month instalment plan starting at registration.

How to pay your fees directly

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Funding for UK & EU students

We offer most new undergraduate students funding to support their studies and university life. There’s also finance available for specific groups of students.

Grants and scholarships are available for:

Entry requirements

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Important additional notes

Our published entry requirements are a guide only and our decision will be based on your overall suitability for the course as well as whether you meet the minimum entry requirements. Other equivalent qualifications may be accepted for entry to this course, please email answers@anglia.ac.uk for further information.

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