Healthcare Science BSc (Hons)

Full-time undergraduate (3 years)

Cambridge

September 2016

Intermediate award: DipHE

code: B902

The entry requirements below are for students starting in September 2016.

Overview

This course opens up the world of healthcare science. You’ll learn how to use specialist equipment to diagnose and treat problems relating to patients’ circulatory or respiratory systems, as well as problems which can cause difficulties sleeping. On graduation, you could work in a hospital or in the community.

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Full description

Careers

Healthcare science practitioners work in a variety of hospital clinics and departments, and increasingly within the community. They investigate the functioning of organs and body systems in order to diagnose abnormalities. They also find ways to restore function and reduce disabling consequences to the patient.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules

  • Professional Practice for Healthcare 1
    Introduction to professional practice, which is a vertical strand in the Modernising Scientific Careers curriculum. Gain the knowledge to underpin the skills and attitudes to prepare you to undertake the role of a practitioner within healthcare. Become aware of your legal, ethical, professional and occupational responsibilities towards the patients/clients whom you encounter in your practice and the implications of malpractice. You’ll be introduced to the concepts of client consent, confidentiality, data protection and safeguarding. National and local policy drivers in relation to improving standards of care will be introduced. You’ll also be encouraged to examine the perceptions of care from the patient’s or client’s perspective, and will develop an appreciation of the rights and feelings of patients’ relatives and significant others. In addition, issues directly relating to the work environment such as health and safety, codes of conduct, legislation and departmental protocols, infection control and professional and occupational standards will be addressed. You’ll start to develop skills of reflective practice and professional communication with clients and the multidisciplinary team. Assessment will be by a 3,000 word essay and will focus on the interactions between individuals considering rights and responsibilities and how communication between the different parties may influence the relationship and setting of common goals.
  • Analysis and Presentation of Information and Data
    Designed to develop skills in obtaining information and collecting data within healthcare science, analysing the information obtained and presenting it in a logical and coherent way. This module aims to support literature searching and reviewing the quality of information obtained, judging its validity and reliability and presenting the review in a systematic way. It’ll develop the skills of verbal and written presentation supported by a range of visual material. It’ll also focus on the development of academic writing and argument development. You’ll learn a variety of computer applications to analyse and present data, such as SPSS and Excel. Clinically based activities will support the collection of numerical data in a systematic manner and consider the quality of the data and using mathematics to summarise and analyse the data.
  • Anatomy and Physiology for Healthcare
    Anatomy and physiology module provides an opportunity to learn about the internal structure and function of the body focusing on the purpose and interaction of organ systems. To contextualise the information, embryological and common disease strands will be woven in, complementing the more structured approach to surface anatomy. Physiological data will be analysed on how it can have an impact on the wellbeing, safety and treatment of the human body. It’ll also instruct students on anatomical terminology preparing them for language utilised in a clinical environment. Clinical scenarios will be used to highlight function from the perspective of dysfunction, for example chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in relation to inflammation and coronary artery disease and in relation to ischaemia. It’ll also consider the effect of various interventions on normal function. The skills laboratory will be used to conduct elementary physiological experiments whilst developing transferable clinical skills, e.g. the monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure whilst undertaking light exercise or in response to changing body position and the measurement of aspects of lung function. An understanding of the interrelated functions of the body systems is an essential core knowledge requirement for students as they progress towards year 2. The module is delivered over two semesters and assessment is divided into two parts; semester 1 will involve a 3,000 word essay whilst in semester 2, assessment will be a 2 hour exam.
  • Principles of Anatomy and Physiology for Healthcare
    This foundation module in anatomy and physiology provides an opportunity to learn about the important concepts of the structure and function of the human body. It’s taught alongside the first semester of the Anatomy and Physiology for Healthcare module. This enables you to gain underpinning knowledge with regards to the discipline of anatomy and physiology. You’ll learn about the organisation of the human body at a molecular level and continue with topics including biochemistry, cellular structure and function of the body system. It’ll provide you with an opportunity to follow development of the cell and its differentiation into the systems of the body. It’ll explore how these systems are differentiated into different functioning organs according to their structure and histological origin and will consider the interaction of organ systems in the human body. The concept of homeostasis will be explored along with positive and negative feedback systems, in particular in relation to the renal and the endocrine systems. An introduction to genetics and embryological development will enable you to understand abnormal functioning of the system due to genetic and congenital abnormalities. Although the module is not intended to provide extensive coverage of Genomics, you’ll need to appreciate the common range of genetically associated abnormalities. This is a Department of Health initiative which is intending to map the propensity to health and disease across the population. Assessment will be by an open book in-class, 3 hour test.
  • Introduction to Cardiovascular Physiology
    Introducing you to the Healthcare Science discipline of Cardiac and Vascular Physiology underpinning the experience gained in the module Work Place Learning for Healthcare Science 1. You’ll learn about the cardiovascular system, considering the valves of the heart, components of the heart wall, the conduction system and structure of coronary arteries, blood vessels and blood flow. You’ll be introduced to a number of non-invasive diagnostic tests that are performed in both cardiac and vascular departments such as electrocardiography, measurements of blood pressure and vascular ultrasound e.g. carotid arteries. Consider the principles of safe practice and infection control in the clinical environment with a focus on preparing you to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes required in performing a range of diagnostic cardiovascular investigations. Explore the underlying principles of signal acquisition and recording. You’ll gain appreciation of the fundamental knowledge, skills and attitudes required by all healthcare professionals working in cardiac and vascular clinical environments. The module has practical skills elements enabling you to perform resting 12 lead ECG and blood pressure recordings. Assessment is by patchwork text over Semester 2 and to be submitted at the end of the module as one project.
  • Introduction to Respiratory and Sleep Physiology
    Detailed Introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system underpinning the experience gained in the module Work Place Learning for Healthcare Science 1. You’ll be introduced to a number of non-invasive diagnostic tests that are performed in the lung function and sleep laboratories. Time will be dedicated to issues of safe practice, including contraindications to testing and recognising the difference between absolute and relative contraindications. Health and safety features heavily in this module, giving you a good basic understanding of communicable disease and methods available to avoid cross infection. Focusing on preparing you to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes required in performing a range of diagnostic respiratory and sleep investigations. You’ll gain an appreciation of the fundamental skills and attitudes required by all healthcare professionals working in clinical environments. The module has practical elements enabling you to perform basic spirometry, oximetry and simple experiments in the control of ventilation. You’ll be introduced to common reference values and the concept of nomograms and will learn how to apply these in clinical practice. Assessment is by laboratory report (including reflection).
  • Work Place Learning for Healthcare Science
    Gain an awareness of investigations undertaken in a Cardiac, Respiratory, Vascular and Sleep Departments in this extended practice module. The work environment provides a rich setting for exploration and discovery of a range of knowledge, skills and understanding. You’ll be introduced to the clinical working environment and develop knowledge, skills and attitudes related to healthcare science and professional practice. You’ll be expected to demonstrate an awareness of good customer skills and ethical issues relevant to your practice and studies. You’ll share and discuss your experiences of clinical work in order to begin the process of developing the skills and attitudes relevant to the Healthcare Science Practitioner building on learning in the academic environment. You’ll spend 10 weeks which is equivalent to 375 hours in clinical practice in these areas and reflect on your experiences to inform the choice of discipline. This may require you to work outside of normal Monday to Friday office hours in order to explore the patient experiences through cardiac, vascular, respiratory and sleep departments or in the community in order to reflect the Department of Health strategy for 7 days a week service. You’ll be expected to travel to your allocated placement areas which may not be local to where you live. Assessment for this module is through the submission of a clinical practice portfolio to be completed by you during work placement and submitted within an extended semester 2.

Year two, core modules

  • Professional Practice for Healthcare 2
    Continue to develop the professional studies strand of the Modernising Scientific Careers curriculum. The module further develops your view of professional practice by exploring the concept of team dynamics and factors influencing team behaviour, relating them to management and leadership theories and your experience of clinical practice. It’ll consider the members of the multi-professional team and their complementary roles and will also include the potentially different philosophies of different professional groups involved in health care. Communication and interpersonal skills in relation to difficult situations will be explored and will include practical sessions on de-escalation techniques. Moral philosophy and ethics will be explored in terms of professional responsibility and codes of practice as adopted by various professional groups and this will be related to the notion of ‘Fitness for Practice’. Published cases of misconduct reported by a range of professional bodies will be used to support the discussion of what constitutes malpractice in a professional sense. The legal concept of negligence will be examined and reference made to specific legal cases from the health care setting. The principles of evidence based practice and research will be developed through this module to prepare the students for their project in their final year of study. The principles of quality and safety improvement including quality audit, quality assurance and quality management will be related to local and national policies; awareness of one’s own limitations and the relevance of clinical experience are brought together in the exploration of a critical incident which is the assessment method for this module.
  • Health, Illness and Presentation of Disease
    Introduction to the concepts of health and explores the theories of health promotion, public health and disease prevention. It also considers what can trigger a disease and how this can affect the body’s internal environment with regards to homeostatic processes. It starts by taking a wider perspective of Public Health in the UK looking at factors such as policies and guidelines, before focusing on the impact of those illnesses/diseases associated with cardiovascular/respiratory systems, such as tuberculosis and AIDS. Conditions such as diabetes which have a huge burden on the NHS will also be discussed and in addition other associated lifestyle determinants which create health burden such as obesity, pollution and poverty. It’ll include experiential learning of history taking and holistic assessment of a patient. Student you’ll be introduced to the process of clinical assessment to gain the patient history and identify the cause of signs and symptoms. It’ll be supported by the required concurrent experience in clinical practice. It’ll examine the aetiology and presentation of selected diseases by integrating the symptoms and signs and other supporting evidence into the diagnostic approach. It’ll also consider the impact of particular risk factors, for example genetics, environment and lifestyle, on health. Assessment is through a case study (equivalent to a 3,000 word count).
  • Statistical Analysis for Healthcare Science
    Review the research process from hypothesis statement to statistical analysis to enable you to construct a research proposal. You’ll use IBM SPSS Statistics to analyse data, presenting results in a variety of tables and charts and make conclusions based on inferential statistics. It’ll explore concepts such as validity and reliability in data collection and evaluate their impact on the quality of research. You’ll apply the understanding of statistical methods to the analysis of research reports and evaluation of their validity and reliability. You’ll learn to perform descriptive statistical analysis and how to interpret and report the values obtained; this will include measures of central tendency and variation and confidence intervals. Types of data and distribution will be discussed. Methods of presenting descriptive data will include bar charts, histogram and pie chart. You’ll use statistical software SPSS to perform a series of inferential statistics, including parametric and non-parametric tests, and learn how to report and interpret the results. Understanding of how statistics with regards to service evaluation/audit purposes will complement your undergraduate major project in Year 3. Examples of statistical analysis can include T tests, ANOVA, chi-square test, test of proportions. The module will be assessed through an analysis of data sets and writing a research proposal.
  • Work Place Learning for Healthcare Science 2
    Support the development of understanding and the application of theoretical principles and diagnostic procedures to your specific work context. You’ll be encouraged to continue the exploration of your professional/occupational practice. You’ll be expected to demonstrate a greater degree of autonomy in the management of their learning. You’ll demonstrate a more detailed knowledge of relevant theoretical underpinning and be able to analyse and evaluate both information and argument. You’ll spend 15 weeks which is equivalent to 562.5 hours in clinical practice and reflect on your experiences within practice. The work placement will be in either cardiovascular or respiratory/sleep area and the indicative theoretical content covered in this module will relate to that placement. This may require you to work outside of normal Monday to Friday office hours in order to explore the patient experiences in the acute and community sectors and reflect the Department of Health strategy for 7 day per week service. You’ll be expected to travel to your allocated placement areas which may not be local to where they live. Assessment for this module is through the submission of a clinical practice portfolio to be completed by the student during work placement and submitted within an extended semester 2.

Year two, optional modules

  • Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Exercise Stress Testing
    You’ll build on Year 1 learning and begin detailed learning that underpins the routine practical techniques. Within this module you’ll develop specialist knowledge, understanding and the skills required to undertake non-invasive ambulatory blood pressure and Exercise Stress testing and apply these to the experience gained concurrently in the module Work Place Learning for Healthcare Science 2. You’ll understand and identify the normal arterial waveform enabling you to rationalise some causes of hypertension. The basic principles of non-invasive blood pressure monitoring will be explored and the potential errors and artefacts that can occur during routine investigation will be discussed. The range of blood pressure measuring devices will be demonstrated and used by the students. The aetiology of hypertension will be discussed and you’ll consider acquired forms of arterial disease and functional changes with specific reference to myocardial diseases, electrolytes, endocrine, pharmaceutical and renal disorders and their effect on a patient’s cardiac function. You’ll appreciate the effects of untreated hypertension and its management. You’ll gain knowledge of the principles of non-invasive ambulatory blood pressure to evaluate and interpret the data generated from this investigative method and demonstrate capability of technical skills. You’ll understand, identify and engage in exercise stress testing in order to work safely in the clinical environment in accordance with current local and national standards and procedures. You’ll be introduced to a range of stress testing methods and the merits of each method for a given population. You’ll be required to submit an essay of no more than 3,000 words which demonstrates your understanding of the four module learning outcomes.
  • Clinical Electrocardiography
    Develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes required in Clinical Electrocardiography and apply these to the experience gained concurrently in the module Work Place Learning for Healthcare Science 2. You’ll gain an appreciation of the fundamental skills and attitudes required by all healthcare professionals working in clinical practice and at the end of the module you’ll be able to analyse a series of 12 Lead ECGs, identifying the main arrhythmias and link this knowledge to the practice of Ambulatory ECG monitoring. Theoretical aspects of ECG interpretation, electrode application and positioning will be discussed along with the relationship between the position of the recording electrodes and the cardiac wave forms. This will be developed to include recognition of artefacts and how to correct these. You’ll understand the clinical indications and contraindications of performing resting 12 lead ECG. You’ll build on the knowledge and understanding of Electrocardiography to develop the skills required in the evaluation and interpretation of the data generated from Ambulatory ECG monitoring techniques. The clinical indications and contraindications of Ambulatory ECG monitoring will be explored, including methods of analysis and reporting. You’ll appreciate the rationale for using various types of Ambulatory ECG monitors and event recording techniques related to the patient’s symptoms. The assessment consists of a series of 5 OSCE (Observed Structured (practical) Examinations) stations which will enable you to demonstrate achievement of the learning outcomes.
  • Pulmonary Function in Health and Disease
    Respiratory physiology involves a wide variety of diagnostics techniques (both invasive and non-invasive). This module explores non-invasive investigations of pulmonary function. It develops your understanding of technology in the pulmonary function laboratory and enhances your understanding of physiology and pathophysiology. By understanding the relationship between respiratory physiology and respiratory function, you can begin to interpret results in a meaningful way. Methods of delivering inhaled medication will be evaluated. The clinical use and physiological effects of inhaled bronchodilator medication will also be explored. Respiratory Physiology involves a wide range of diagnostic testing and therapeutic services for patients with suspected respiratory disease or conditions that affect the functioning of the respiratory system. The Department of Health (2009) publication Transforming Respiratory and Sleep Diagnostic Services - a Good Practice Guide identified that respiratory disease is the most commonly reported long-term illness. The Department of Health produced its Outcomes Strategy for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and Asthma in 2011 and this document highlighted the need for quality physiological assessment. Furthermore the delivery of seven day services across England is a priority for NHS England (DH 2013). This places a significant and increasing demand for respiratory physiology diagnostic services. You’ll be introduced to national and international guidelines for the performance of pulmonary function tests. You’ll learn about the derivation of reference values and their applications and limitations. Time will be dedicated to addressing the importance and performance of quality control measures. You’ll also learn about equipment maintenance, how to identify errors and trouble-shoot common problems encountered during testing. The module will integrate theory and concurrent clinical practice.
  • Principles of Sleep Investigation and Therapy
    The Sleep Laboratory performs a wide variety of diagnostic tests to evaluate sleep physiology and architecture. From these tests the sleep physiologist can identify abnormal sleep patterns and pathologies and evaluate the need for further tests or evaluate the patient’s response to treatment or disease progression. In the publication “What is Physiological Measurement?” (2007), the Department of Health highlighted that the demand for sleep physiology services is increasing significantly. Sleep disorders are very common and can vary from mild disorders to ones that are life-threatening. The Department of Health publication (2009) Transforming Respiratory and Sleep Diagnostic Services - a Good Practice Guide moved sleep physiology diagnostic services on to the strategic agenda. They identified that the demand of sleep physiology diagnostic tests has consistently and significantly outstripped supply in the NHS. There are in excess of 80 recognised sleep disorders. This module introduces normal physiology of sleep and also examines aspects of disordered sleep physiology. Basic diagnostic techniques such as overnight oximetry will be explored, including a review of recommended measurement techniques and interpretation of results. There will also be an introduction to sleep therapeutics, including Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy. Indications and contraindications to testing and treatment will also be studied. The module runs concurrently with experience in clinical practice and will integrate theory and practice; you are therefore required to attend placement relevant to this module.

Year three, core modules

  • Professional Practice for Healthcare 3
    Expand your views of professional practice by reviewing difficult situations amongst groups and teams and dealing with change and conflict. It’ll examine change at a personal, departmental and organisational level and how it may be facilitated and potential barriers overcome. Evidence based practice will be emphasised as a means of ensuring quality of performance. Organisational and management culture will be explored. The legal principles related to accountability and autonomy for a newly qualified practitioner will be reviewed and explored through discussion of cases of professional conduct and practice. Quality review and enhancement will be expanded on and related to local and national governance policies and the evidence used to support policy development will be considered in terms of its origins and quality. The role of quality assurance mechanisms within the clinical arena will be examined and the contribution of all members of the healthcare care team explored with particular reference to clinical governance and service improvements. It’ll encourage you to critically analyse your skills and potential to facilitate change in practice through audit, policies, procedures or guidelines. The concepts of reflection in practice and reflection on practice will be explored with specific reference to professional development and professional practice. Evidence of this will be presented within a report and action plan reviewing a professional issue in practice and strategies to inform personal development.
  • Work Place Learning for Healthcare Science 3
    This module is intended to support the development of understanding and the application of theoretical principles and diagnostic procedures to the student’s specific work context. It embeds work based learning within academic study and aims to help you develop initiative and experience in professional practice. It offers you the opportunity to sample a professional work environment, broadening the range of skills which you acquire. Such skills are implicit in the learning outcomes. You’ll be encouraged to further continue your exploration of professional/occupational practice. You’ll be expected to demonstrate a greater degree of autonomy in the management of their learning in clinical practice, will demonstrate a more detailed knowledge of relevant theories and be able to analyse and evaluate both information and argument. You’ll spend 25 weeks which is equivalent to 937.5 hours in clinical practice and reflect on your experiences within practice. The work placement will be in either cardiovascular or respiratory/sleep area and the indicative theoretical content you cover in this module will relate to that placement. This may require you to work outside of normal Monday to Friday office hours in order to explore the patient experiences in the acute and community sectors and reflect the Department of Health strategy for 7 day week service. You’ll be expected to travel to your allocated placement areas which may not be local to where you live. Assessment for this module is through the submission of a clinical practice portfolio to be completed by you during work placement and submitted within an extended semester 2.
  • Major Project
    The individual final project module allows you to engage in a substantial piece of individual research focused on a topic relevant to their studies. The project topic will have been assessed for suitability with discussions with an appropriate project supervisor to ensure sufficient academic challenge and research feasibility. The project may be in the form of primary research (e.g. laboratory, human or questionnaire-based data, clinical service evaluation, clinical placement, or other relevant acceptable sources), OR in the form of an extended literature review. The chosen topic will require you to identify/formulate problems and issues, conduct literature reviews, evaluate information, investigate using suitable methodologies, process and analyse data, critically analyse, appraise and present findings using suitable methods or media. Regular meetings/contact with the project supervisor will take place, so that the project is closely monitored and steered in the right direction. Formative assessment is an individual presentation of the research topic, methodology undertaken (and any data acquired) in week 6/7. This will assist in a ‘feed-forward’ manner in the development of the final Summative assessment would normally include a substantial written project report.

Year three, optional modules

  • Maintenance and Evaluation of Blood Gas Status
    Historically, arterial blood sampling was the method of choice for assessing blood gas status. More recently, the use of capillary blood samples has become more commonplace and indeed has become a routine test in many respiratory physiology laboratories and is performed by clinical physiologists. Furthermore, arterial blood gas sampling is increasingly being performed by experienced clinical physiologists. This module introduces you to these more advanced diagnostic tests. Portable blood gas analysers have become available enabling these techniques to become ‘point of care’ tests. You’ll explore in detail the physiology of blood gas maintenance during rest and exercise and will also learn about the respiratory and metabolic compensation mechanisms. You’ll critically evaluate methods available for both invasive and non-invasive methods of blood gas analysis. Non-invasive methods of assessment include pulse oximetry and transcutaneous monitoring. The module will highlight how these techniques can be applied in practice and issues of health and safety will be examined in detail. You’ll also develop skills in blood gas interpretation and review both positive and negative methods of ventilation support. The module requires students to have concurrent clinical experience to apply and contextualise the learning and complete the assessment task. Assessment is by case study.
  • Cardiac Pressure Measurements, Monitoring and Clinical Investigations
    Develop knowledge, skills and attitudes required in the application of haemodynamic and cardiac catheterisation procedures and to work safely in the clinical environment. It requires you to have concurrent clinical experience to apply and contextualise the learning. You’ll gain an appreciation of the fundamental skills and attitudes required by all healthcare professionals working in clinical practice and at the end of the module, you’ll have gained knowledge and understanding of a range of invasive pressure measurements and procedures. Theoretical aspects of the technical role required by the physiologist will be considered and the importance of procedures within the laboratory will be discussed. Haemodynamic monitoring incorporating left and right pressure ranges, troubleshooting such as damping, overshoot and sensitivity will be covered. Complications pre, during and post procedures will be identified, patient safety within the laboratory and hospital infection control will also be considered. The recognition of common duties carried out by the technician for diagnostic/intervention procedures such coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures within the catheter laboratory will also be identified. The assessment is by a case study to address the learning outcomes. You’ll be required to identify a patient whom you are working within the placement, identified by the care pathway to accommodate the module assignment. All patient data will remain confidential. You’ll need to ensure that patients consent to their situation being used for the study.
  • Diagnosis and Management of Cardiac Diseases
    Develop the knowledge and skills required to understand the diagnostic techniques and the management of congenital and acquired heart disease. It requires you to have concurrent clinical practice to support and apply the learning and to complete the assessment. It’s designed to provide you with the knowledge and understanding of acquired heart disease and its effect on the heart and circulation such Atheroma, Thrombosis, Embolism and Infarction An overview of congenital heart disease will provide an understanding of Embryology, Circulatory changes at birth such as Atrial and Ventricular septal defects. Further areas of consideration include Common symptoms and signs of cardiac disease which include Ischaemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, Acquired valvular heart disease, Hypertensive heart disease, a range of Cardiomyopathies and Autonomic disorders. Common symptoms and signs of vascular disease such as Peripheral Artery and Venous Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease will provide further learning within this module. It’ll introduce you to a range of diagnostic techniques such as Echocardiography, Magnetic Resonant Imaging, Computerised Tomography and Head Up Tilt Testing which provides important diagnostic data and also in the monitoring during the management of the patient. It’ll incorporate the integrated care pathways so the student can understand how the management of the patient is decided by Health Professionals. The assessment will be based on an Individual 15 minute presentation with a 5 minute Question and Answers session and will be submitted with a supporting paper based on the chosen topic. This will be based on a patient identified during Workbase placement and is designed to meet the learning outcomes.
  • Principles and Practice of Cardiac Pacing
    Prepares you to develop knowledge and skills required in the application of bradycardia device implantation and procedures and to work safely in the clinical environment. The module requires you to have concurrent clinical experience to apply and contextualise the learning and complete the assessment task. You’ll gain an appreciation of the fundamental skills and attitudes required by all healthcare professionals working in clinical practice and at the end of the module, you’ll have gained knowledge and understanding of the concepts of bradycardia pacing. Within this module the areas to be considered include the theoretical aspects of the technical role required by the physiologist. You’ll understand and gain knowledge about the components of a pacemaker, Bradycardia pacing modes and pacing codes. You’ll recognise indications and contraindications for bradycardia device implantation, the implantation technique and asepsis and the expertise required in providing technical assistance during the implantation of a pacemaker device and the rationale for follow up and factors influencing it. You’ll understand and learn troubleshooting skills and the potential common complications that can arise during procedures, aspects of patient safety and infection control will be considered. It’s an expectation that you’ll have become able to problem solve and critical in the way they assess the patients need for the appropriate test. Assessment will be by a case study equivalent to 3,000 words to meet the learning outcomes. The case study will be selected by the care pathway, in agreement with the patient and by ensuring all patient data remains confidential.
  • The Assessment and Treatment of Sleep Disorders
    Diagnostic tests performed in the sleep physiology laboratory are used to identify abnormal sleep patterns and pathologies in order to provide data to undertake assessment and support therapeutic intervention. This module expands on the Basic Sleep Investigation and Therapy module. There is a more detailed exploration and interpretation of the normal physiology and architecture of sleep. Disordered sleep will be examined in greater detail, with particular attention paid to obstructive sleep apnoea, a disorder that constitutes the majority of the sleep laboratory workload. There will be an evaluation of the clinical value of routine diagnostic tests such as overnight oximetry; furthermore this module examines how more advanced methods (e.g. full polysomnography) may be applied to patients with a range of sleep disorders. The relationship between lung mechanics (including airway patency) and sleep physiology are explored in detail. The application of pulmonary function tests in obstructive sleep apnoea and other sleep disorders will also be reviewed. The use of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) will be evaluated in more detail, including assessment of therapeutic effectiveness. Other sleep therapies (including pharmacological therapies) will be examined. Care pathways will be studied and there will be a review of the medico-legal implications and DVLA regulations associated with sleep disorders. Assessment is by case study.
  • Challenging the Respiratory System
    Provides the theoretical foundation you need to gain practical competence in respiratory muscle assessment and challenge testing (including bronchial provocation and skin allergy testing. Respiratory muscle assessment is important to determine the integrity of the respiratory muscles and nerve supply. Both invasive and non-invasive methods of assessment will be evaluated. Bronchial provocation testing in the pulmonary function laboratory allows assessment of airways’ hyper-responsiveness. There are a variety of direct and indirect methods available which can be used to assess airway reactivity and the physiological response mediated by a number of cellular and mechanical pathways. During this module you’ll learn to critically evaluate a range of techniques which provoke bronchoconstriction, including direct and indirect methods and a variety of provocation agents. You’ll review methods for measuring the degree of bronchoconstriction. In addition to bronchial challenge testing, you’ll also explore the use and nature of skin prick testing to evaluate the response to a variety of allergens associated with airway responsiveness. You’ll develop knowledge of the immunological principles associated with skin prick testing and apply this to clinical practice. Furthermore there will be a review of methods available for the assessment of airway inflammation. Pharmacological agents will be reviewed in light of the above. By developing a detailed knowledge of the mechanisms associated with airway hyper-responsiveness and allergy, you’ll be able to understand the rationale and use of a range of treatment options. You’ll learn to interpret and report results and will be able to rationalise the health and safety measures taken before, during and after testing.

Assessment

We use a wide range of assessment methods to help you and your tutors measure your progress on the course. Besides exams, these include laboratory reports, presentations, essays, a portfolio, patchwork texts (short pieces of writing, or ‘patches’, built up week by week), a research proposal and a major project.

This is a three year programme

Alongside your core modules you will pick a number of optional modules. Please note that modules are subject to change and availability.

Where you'll study

Your faculty

The Faculty of Medical Science, opened in 2014, is founded on the strong international reputation of our flagship Postgraduate Medical Institute. Based on our riverside campus in Chelmsford and Young Street campus in Cambridge, we deliver innovative and clinically relevant teaching and research across two departments:

  • Department of Allied and Public Health
  • Department of Medicine and Healthcare Science.

Thanks to our close relationships with the major clinical-care providers in the east of England, there are significant opportunities for collaboration and student placements across a variety of clinical sites.

We offer exciting opportunities for research and education in the allied health professions. We also translate science and epidemiology into health education and primary care, and deliver taught Master’s programmes to qualified medics. We have a flourishing community of PhD and MD(Res) students across all of our research fields.

Our advanced learning facilities include state-of-the-art clinical skills laboratories and simulation suites, which mirror real-life clinical situations. We also have a fantastic, modern library and a wide range of science labs and ICT suites.

Where can I study?

Cambridge
Lord Ashcroft Building on our Cambridge campus

Our campus is close to the centre of Cambridge, often described as the perfect student city.

Explore our Cambridge campus

Fees & funding

Course fees

UK & EU students, 2016/17 (per year)

£9,000

Additional costs

Part-payment of travel to placements
£25 is provided towards travel, further costs will need to be covered by the student

How do I pay my fees?

You can pay your fees in the following ways.

Tuition fee loan

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Most English undergraduates take out a tuition fee loan with Student Finance England. The fees are then paid directly to us. The amount you repay each month is linked to your salary and repayments start in April after you graduate.

How to apply for a tuition fee loan

Paying upfront

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If you choose not to take out a loan you can pay your fees directly to us. There are two ways to do this: either pay in full, or through a three- or six-month instalment plan starting at registration.

How to pay your fees directly

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Funding for UK & EU students

We offer most new undergraduate students funding to support their studies and university life. There’s also finance available for specific groups of students.

Grants and scholarships are available for:

Entry requirements

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Entry requirements are not currently available, please try again later.

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Important additional notes

Our published entry requirements are a guide only and our decision will be based on your overall suitability for the course as well as whether you meet the minimum entry requirements. Other equivalent qualifications may be accepted for entry to this course, please email answers@anglia.ac.uk for further information.

We don't accept AS level qualifications on their own for entry to our undergraduate degree courses. However for some degree courses a small number of tariff points from AS levels are accepted as long as they're combined with tariff points from A levels or other equivalent level 3 qualifications in other subjects.

Entry requirements are for September 2016 entry. Entry requirements for other intakes may differ.

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International students

We welcome applications from international and EU students, and accept a range of international qualifications.

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English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you'll need to make sure you meet our English language requirements for undergraduate courses.

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Improving your English language skills

If you don't meet our English language requirements, we offer a range of courses which could help you achieve the level required for entry onto a degree course.

We also provide our own English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT) in the UK and overseas. To find out if we are planning to hold an ELPT in your country, contact our country managers.

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