English Language and Linguistics BA (Hons)

Full-time undergraduate (3 years)

Cambridge

January 2017, September 2016

code: Q310

Available in Clearing call now 01223 698444

Overview

Do you want a deeper understanding of language as an important bridge for many cultures across the globe? This course will develop your knowledge of English, its nature, mechanics, and evolution. You’ll also have the chance to explore specialist skills like creative writing and Teaching English as a Foreign Language, opening up many new career options.

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Full description

Careers

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If you’re aiming for a career that needs good linguistic and analytic skills, then this is the course for you. Many of our recent graduates have found employment in communications, public relations and marketing, while others have gone on to take qualifications in speech therapy or teaching, and now work in primary or secondary schools.

Or you might enjoy your course so much you’ll choose to continue your education on a Masters course, like our MA Applied Linguistics and TESOL or MA TESOL and Materials Development.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules

  • Revealing English Structure: The Phrase
    This module will give you a thorough grounding in and understanding of the grammar of simple sentences of present day English. You will begin by considering what is meant by ‘grammar’ and the difference between descriptive and prescriptive approaches to the grammar of English. Then you will learn about basic word classes (e.g. nouns, verbs, auxiliaries) and how to identify them reliably using grammatical tests. You will also study sentence structure and the idea that language is made up of phrases, again developing tools (diagnostics) to help you identify these phrases (constituents) reliably. A crucial aspect of this will be your ability to identify the basic building blocks of sentences (subjects and predicates). Another will be your familiarity with the complexities of the English auxiliary verb system, and your understanding of the grammatical differences between lexical verbs and auxiliaries. By the end of the module, as well as being able to identify basic categories (e.g., verb, noun and auxiliary), you will be able to diagnose the structure of a given sentence using a set of key diagnostics and to draw tree diagrams to represent this sentence structure. Links to the teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages will be highlighted and some seminar exercises and a part of the assessment will focus on applying what you have learnt to this context. Teaching for this module will consist of weekly two-hour interactive seminars, during which time you will get the chance to discuss exercises which you have worked through at home. You will also be asked to present your findings to the group and to provide peer evaluation and feedback. The assessment will consist of a variety of in-class exercises requiring you to analyse the structure of language samples, including drawing tree diagrams. Feedback on exercises completed during the semester will help you improve your performance on the final in-class test.
  • Semantics and Pragmatics
    This module will introduce you to the concepts and terminology of semantics (the study of meaning in language) and pragmatics (the study of meaning in context), and give you the analytical tools to begin exploring the various sources of meaning. These sources include the inherent meaning of words and other linguistic expressions, their relatedness to other lexical items, the textual environment in which they occur, and the wider context and world-knowledge of speaker and listener (or writer and reader). You will attend a weekly lecture and one-hour seminar, in which you will work extensively in small groups, provide peer feedback to your classmates and reflect on your own performance. The topic of the week will be introduced in the lecture and explored in the seminar discussion, for which you will be given a preparatory task. Your assessment will consist of a portfolio of course work. For the first task (about 700 words) you will look at an individual word to explore etymology, connotation, collocation, semantic relationships and areas of pragmatic usage. You will receive feedback on this task to help you improve your performance in the second task (about 2,200 words), in which you will analyse a text for its semantic and pragmatic content, with reference to theories of meaning. You will also submit a short reflective statement about how you have used feedback on the first task to improve your performance on the second task. The key employability skill you will develop in this module is written communication, especially the ability to produce clear, well-structured paragraphs.
  • Language and Data
    Empirical research aims to advance knowledge using evidence gained by direct observation through the senses, rather than deductive reasoning, abstract theorising or speculation. In the study of language, empirical research uses data from e.g. experiments, questionnaires or texts to investigate questions about the nature and use of language. In this practical module you will be introduced to some of the methods used in the study of language, through participation in a class project. You will work collaboratively with other members of the class to answer a specific question about language by collecting data, analysing it and producing a report. This will involve using basic descriptive statistics, including graphs and tables, and appropriate software to produce them. You will also consider the ethical and legal implications of collecting data from human participants. The module will be delivered through eight three-hour workshops. In preparation for each workshop you will be expected to read about some aspect of English language or empirical methodology and undertake a preparatory task. You will receive feedback on both this preparatory work and on tasks carried out in class, to help in the development of your final report. You will be assessed through a portfolio of coursework, which may include in-class tests, collaborative activities, peer evaluation and reflective response to feedback, in addition to the project report itself. Up to 20% of the mark will be a group mark, while at least 70% of the mark will be allocated to your individual final report. This module contributes to the development of your employability skills including self-management, teamwork, problem solving, communication and literacy, IT skills, numeracy and project management.
  • Intercultural Awareness
    This module will give you insight into interpersonal communication in a culturally diverse world. You'll build on your own knowledge, your sense of identity, and your cognitive and communication skills, by examining your own culture and forming insights into the way cultural assumptions affect the behavioural judgements and communication codes of other cultures. You'll learn about the powerful effects group loyalties have on perception and understanding, explore the interplay of language, behaviour and cultural values, and examine some theories of cultural comparison. You'll also learn to recognise the signs of intercultural misunderstanding and culture shock, and the need to build common ground, communicating mindfully when necessary.
  • Revealing English Structure: The Sentence
    This module will give you a thorough grounding in and understanding of the grammar of simple and complex sentences in present day English. You will begin by discussing basic categories (nouns, verbs, auxiliaries) and how to identify them reliably using grammatical tests. You will also study sentence structure and the idea that language is made up of phrases, again developing tools (diagnostics) to help you identify these phrases (constituents) reliably. A crucial aspect of this will be your ability to identify the building blocks of complex sentences, namely noun phrases and clauses, and to understand the notion of movement, whereby a certain word/morpheme may have more than one function in a given sentence. By the end of the module, as well as being able to identify basic categories (e.g. verb, noun and auxiliary), you will be able to diagnose the structure of a given complex sentence using a set of key diagnostics and to draw tree diagrams to represent this structure. Links to the teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages will be highlighted and some seminar exercises and a part of the in-class test will focus on applying what you have learnt to this context. Teaching for this module will consist of weekly two-hour interactive seminars, during which time you will get the chance to discuss exercises which you have worked through at home. You will also be asked to present your findings to the group and to provide peer evaluation and feedback. The assessment will consist of a variety of in-class exercises requiring you to analyse the structure of language samples, including drawing tree diagrams. Feedback on exercises completed during the semester will help you improve your performance on the final in-class test.
  • Introduction to the Sounds of English
    This module will introduce you to the system of sounds used in the English language, focussing on standard southern British English. Firstly, you'll learn how the various speech organs, such as the tongue and lips, are used to produce the range of sounds found in the language, how computer software can be used to visualise these sounds, and the terminology used to describe and classify them. Secondly, you'll learn to represent the sounds of English using the special symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). You'll be assessed by an in-class practical test, consisting of short answer questions about the nature and production of English sounds, as well as simple calculations and a transcription exercise in which you'll convert words from IPA to alphabetic spelling and vice versa.
  • Language and Society
    This module will introduce you to practical and theoretical aspects of the study of language and society, including forms of address; sex and age differentiation in language; accent and dialect; education and employment; language disadvantage; language choice according to function in multi-lingual communities. In weekly lectures you'll discover the key theoretical, analytical and descriptive terms, then explore these issues through a mixture of practical and discussion tasks in workshops. You'll analyse data closely and consider the reasons for collecting, analysing and interpreting it, as well as the practicalities involved. You will then design your own original, hypothetical sociolinguistic project. You'll also write a discussion-based essay, giving you an opportunity to identify, reflect on and synthesise some of the key concepts involved in one or two of the topics covered.
  • The Nature of Language
    This module will give you an overview of the psychological representation of language, touching upon many areas of linguistics, including: the nature of language and languages; animal communication; child language acquisition; the relationship between language, thought and meaning; and language disorders. You will learn about the way first languages are acquired and how this process and its end product differ from animal communication systems. You will then move on to consider the connection between language and thought and how words and sentences come to be meaningful. Finally, you will learn about language disorders, both in terms of how and why language can become impaired and in terms of what this means for our understanding of language more widely. During the module you will be introduced to many of the core questions in linguistics and will encounter some of the main theories and ideas of the discipline. You will attend a weekly two-hour seminar in which you will be expected to make an active contribution using your reading and other preparatory tasks. The overall focus will be on the development of transferable intellectual skills, including the recognition of what constitutes evidence, the analysis of data to provide it, the critical evaluation of arguments and the identification of underlying assumptions. You will be assessed through a presentation, given with another student, for which you will be required to integrate aspects from several of the areas covered. You will have the opportunity to submit visual aids (a handout and/or slides) during the semester and receive formative feedback on them; 10% of your final mark will be awarded for a written response to this feedback. The module contributes to the development of your employability skills including self-management, especially readiness to improve your own performance based on feedback, teamwork, oral communication and IT skills.

Year two, core modules

  • Structure of English Past and Present
    On this module you will consider the history of the English language from its origins to the modern period. To better understand how the language originated and developed, you will touch upon important historical events, but the focus will be very much on the language and how it has changed and adjusted to outside influences. To see evidence of this change in action, you will look at some actual texts from Old, Middle and Early Modern English and discuss central changes in pronunciation, spelling and grammar. You will be assessed by a two-hour in-class test, which includes an essay component as well as shorter analytical and fact-checking questions.
  • English Phonetics and Phonology
    In this module, you'll build on your understanding of the sound system of the English language by exploring how sounds are combined to form words and longer utterances in standard southern British English. You'll learn about the structure of the English syllable and the relative prominence of different syllables, the differences between the pronunciation of words in isolation and in natural speech, and the form and functions of intonation. You'll also investigate some of the difficulties involved in representing speech as a series of phonemes.
  • Language and Image
    This module will introduce you to semiotics and structuralism through the work of canonical theorists. You will apply theories of structuralism to a variety of forms of communication, including visual and other media, in order to explore the ways in which structures of language and image inform, develop and control society. You will study the work of Saussure, Barthes, Foucault, Derrida, Irigaray and others, firstly to discover the history connecting structuralism to post-structuralism, and then to apply the ideas of these theorists to various kinds of visual communication to investigate how written, spoken and visual language informs identity, difference, social inclusion and exclusion. By applying structuralism and post-structuralism to fine art, television, film, advertising and other representations of rhetoric and communication, you will advance your understanding of how all modes of communication linguistically structure the world. You will go on to develop tools for navigating and challenging structures of language within a contemporary context, so as to open spaces for new world views, for a general acceptance of difference and for an ‘ecology of meaning’ that can contribute toward sustainable ethical futures. You will work in groups throughout the course discussing interpretations and examples of the reading and giving short group presentations based on the reading. Feedback and reflection on these presentations will help you prepare for the module assessment - an individual 10 minute oral presentation in which you will synthesise ideas discussed in the module, and a written reflection on presentations given by other students and feedback on your own work.
  • Research Methods for English Language, Linguistics and TESOL
    On this module you will produce a research proposal for your major project in English Language, Linguistics or TESOL. You will be given a list of suggested topics or specific projects from which to choose (you may also propose your own topic provided a member of our teaching team has the necessary expertise to supervise it and considers it appropriate). You will learn how to structure a research proposal, to formulate a research question and hypothesis, and to undertake a preliminary literature search to frame your question. You will go on to consider various types of data collection and analysis methods, and how these can be used to address different types of question. The objective is to clearly formulate both your own research question and how you plan to find an answer to it. The module will be delivered through a weekly two-hour workshop. In preparation for each workshop you will be expected to undertake preparatory reading and complete a task; this will prepare you to contribute actively to class discussion and other activities, including presenting your emerging ideas about your project. You will receive feedback on these activities to help in the development of your proposal. Assessment will be through a portfolio of coursework consisting of the various elements of the proposal plus a reflective statement about how you have used feedback received during the module. This module contributes to the development of your employability skills including self-management, problem solving, communication and literacy, IT skills, numeracy and project management.
  • Regional Varieties of British English
    The British Isles are well known for their diversity in terms of accents and dialects of English. In fact, among all the English-speaking regions of the world, Britain has the highest number of regional dialects. Many of these dialects vary so much that they seem to be virtually unintelligible to English speakers from other regions. In this module you will explore why regional dialects of English in Britain vary so much. You will look at the linguistic properties of different dialects, including phonological and syntactic variation. You will also consider socio-cultural, political and educational variables that influence the shape, form and use of these dialects. In class, you will work extensively in small groups and be expected to give short presentations based on your preparatory reading. You will also provide peer feedback to your classmates and reflect on your own performance. The assessment consists of a portfolio of coursework, including descriptions of the development of specific varieties of British English and analyses of the phonology and syntax of these varieties. To help you prepare for this final assessment, you will be required to submit a short written piece of formative assessment, i.e. you will receive constructive feedback but no mark for it. In your final portfolio you will be required to include reflective comments on how you have addressed this feedback. The formative assessment has to be submitted during the semester at a date specified by your module tutor. Key employability skills developed in this module are teamwork and project management. Key academic skills developed in the module are qualitative data analysis at the level of phonetic and phonological structure and syntactic structure. You will also develop your skills in finding, using and managing digital information.

Year two, optional modules

  • Intercultural Encounters in Global Cinema
    On this module, you'll examine how the effects of increasing globalisation and the expansion of the European Union have been closely monitored and discussed not only in political discourse but in media as well. Cinema and TV are no exceptions, and such media portrayals are of key importance, be it as potential reflections of popular attitudes, ideas and preoccupations towards migration, or their likely impact on popular views and opinions on the topic. You'll investigate how the global perspective goes beyond the exploration of individual films in their national frameworks, and is therefore better equipped to address questions linked to the legacy of globalisation and international migration.
  • TESOL - The Language System
    This module is the first in a series of modules related to English Language Teaching. It will increase your language awareness and give ideas and techniques for teaching language items such as grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. You will examine skills such as reading, writing, listening and speaking in order to identify sub-skills and potential student problems, and assess methods and materials to develop these skills. You will also look at the elements of lesson planning and terminology related to language teaching. The module is organised into weekly lectures and seminars. The seminars will be interactive, involving you in activities, tasks and presentations and encouraging collaboration with other students.
  • Stylistics
    This module will give you a theoretical overview of the situational and contextual factors that determine genre and equip you with the ability to describe in detail the structural and organisational differences between a range of text types. The ground covered will familiarise you with the organisation of a wide variety of texts, ranging from literary stories to those found in women's magazines and those that make the daily headlines, and from academic essays to text messages and web pages. This will enable you to distinguish between, and to reproduce, the particular contextual and compositional characteristics of many of the texts we encounter in our personal and professional lives. No prior familiarity with text analysis will be assumed: weekly 1 hour lectures will provide the introductory theoretical input, which you will then put into practice and explore in weekly 1 hour followup workshops. In preparation for the workshops, you will be set analytical and observational tasks (both individually and in groups), which you will be asked to report back on.
  • Language and Gender
    In this module you will explore the question of gender, one of the major concerns of contemporary scholarly fields including discourse analysis, media studies, philosophy, cultural theory and feminist criticism. You will investigate the ways in which different modes of expression, through language and the body, create and challenge gender and identity. Your exploration will highlight the importance of gender as an analytical category for comprehending issues such as language acquisition and expression, language and gender as performance, the body in society, power, desire, agency (a capacity to act), and understandings of the human and posthuman. You will consider gender from various perspectives, such as with reference to systems of knowledge and power, the organisation of social relations, lived experience, representations and readings of the body, and challenging gender norms. You will explore these different perspectives through the theories of key scholars, cutting-edge linguistic debates and critical theory, as well as the ways these theoretical perspectives are seen in everyday life and the media. Your developing awareness of gender will also shed light on a series of further questions and approaches, which include sexuality, feminism, trans/intersex modes of being, queer studies, and critical masculinity studies. Overall, you will approach gender as a multi-faceted problem, a highly useful, even experimental concept, and a set of linguistically learned and expressed practices - expressions, experiences and experiments - that are central to our existence and to identity. You will be expected to give short presentations in class, based on your preparatory reading, and your assessment will consist of a 2500 word essay and a supporting task.
  • TESOL - Language Skills
    This module aims to extend and consolidate the language knowledge, teaching skills and methodology covered in TESOL: The Language System. It will help you develop your understanding of language items not dealt with previously and explore ways of analysing and presenting language for teaching at different ability levels. You will be introduced to error analysis and discuss different correction techniques. During the module you will also deal with a variety of ELT published material and authentic material and focus on learner training, learning strategies and teaching English for specific purposes. This module is organised into weekly lectures and seminars. The seminars aim to be as interactive as possible involving students in micro-teaching, presentations and encouraging you to collaborate with other students. Extracts from videos of teachers in practice will be used to highlight and discuss certain practical issues related to classroom practice.
  • News and Feature Writing
    This intensive reading and writing module will introduce you to the techniques of print journalism, focusing on news reports and feature articles. The skills required for effective news and feature writing are a key component of writing craft in any genre of fiction or non-fiction. It's a discipline that improves the imaginative work and communicative power of those who practice it. You'll explore the significance of journalistic writing in contemporary life using examples from a range of British tabloid, broadsheet and local publications. You'll practise sourcing news reports, developing feature articles and sub-editing for style and content. In seminar workshops, you'll combine analysis of journalistic techniques with practical writing exercises, covering topics that include: researching and pitching a story; interviewing; puns and rhythm; and economical use of language. Early on, you'll produce a set of briefs that must be approved by the seminar leader, then produce copy for these briefs and, in editorial teams, giving and receiving constructive criticism.
  • Postcolonialism
    On this module you'll explore the meanings that were once attached to the British Empire and how some 19th and early 20th century writers expressed their often contradictory and ambivalent attitudes to the imperial project and the responsibilities of running an empire. These writers may include Rudyard Kipling, E.M. Forster, Flora Annie Steele, and George Orwell. You'll then read and analyse selected texts by writers from nations which have won their independence from Britain (for example Derek Walcott and Ama Ata Aidoo), comparing them with texts written from European perspectives. You'll also be introduced to the ideas of post-colonial theorists such as Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak and Homi Babha, and discuss influential critical concepts such as orientalism, the subaltern and mimicry. At the end of the module you'll examine the significance of multicultural ideas and examples of writing produced by both first- and second-generation immigrants to Britain, possibly including some film or television material. Your assessment will take the form of a 3000-word essay.
  • Sociology of Education
    This module will introduce you to key sociological perspectives on schooling and education. Schooling systems and strategies are instrumental in shaping individual and collective identities, and in reflecting and reinforcing dominant societal values. On this module, you'll engage with the central scholarly and political debates that surround these issues. More specifically, you'll explore how experiences of schooling are shaped by social dimensions such as class, gender, ethnicity and sexuality. You'll consider the basic functions of education, before exploring topics such as the micro-politics of everyday school life; higher education; employability and the knowledge economy; schooling and the negotiation of masculinities and femininities; schooling and sexuality; and schooling, ethnicity and whiteness. Your assessment for this module will be a 3,000 word essay.
  • The History of the Book
    In this module you'll explore the cultural and technological contexts of the publishing of literary works, and the history of the publishing industry in Britain. You'll examine its styles, types and trajectories, and consider that history in light of the market for books, pamphlets and periodicals, and the issues (such as new technology, new infrastructure, copyright and censorship) that have affected them. Your assessment will consist of an independently-researched portfolio, including a critical assessment of an issue identified in the seminars, accompanied by supporting evidence presented as a blog, a series of slides, an electronic scrap book, or in an alternative electronic format of your own choice.

Year three, core modules

  • Major Project
    The individual Major Project will allow you to undertake a substantial piece of individual research, focused on a topic relevant to your specific course. Your topic will be assessed for suitability to ensure sufficient academic challenge and satisfactory supervision by an academic member of staff. The project will require you to identify/formulate problems and issues, conduct research, evaluate information, process data, and critically appraise and present your findings/creative work. You should arrange and attend regular meetings with your project supervisor, to ensure that your project is closely monitored and steered in the right direction.
  • Empirical Linguistics
    On this module you will acquire in-depth knowledge about a well-defined area of English linguistics as well as the methodological skills to explore it. You will undertake a class project designed to answer a specific research question, for which you will learn to use appropriate quantitative methods and software. You will work collaboratively with other students in class, but will be expected to exercise autonomy in writing up your report. The module will be delivered through a weekly two-hour workshop. In preparation for each workshop you will be expected to read about some aspect of English linguistics or empirical methodology and undertake a preparatory task. This reading will include original research. You will be assessed through a portfolio of coursework for which most of the marks will be allocated to your final project report. You will also undertake supporting tasks during the semester, on which you will receive feedback to help in the development of your work. You will be expected to reflect on how you have used feedback on these tasks to improve your final report. This module contributes to the development of your employability skills including self-management, teamwork, problem solving, communication and literacy, IT skills, numeracy and project management.
  • Languages in Contrast
    This module gives you the opportunity to explore the relationship between English and other languages. You will discover how human languages differ, and which properties they share, across the full range of linguistic systems: lexis, syntax, morphology and phonology. You will also learn about the number and distribution of the world’s languages and how they are thought to be related to one another. The course will be delivered through a weekly lecture and one-hour seminar, the lecture introducing you to the main concepts involved in linguistic typology and historical linguistics, using examples from a range of human languages. To prepare for the seminar you will use these concepts to analyse linguistic data, with a focus on inductive reasoning. This means using information about a sample of language to draw conclusions about a language or languages in general, taking into account the frequency and distribution of different features, and the correlations between them. You will receive formative feedback on your work through the subsequent discussion of these exercises in class. Your learning will be assessed on the basis of a piece of coursework in which you compare and contrast English with another language, with reference to the concepts discussed in the module.

Year three, optional modules

  • Global English
    More than a billion people world-wide speak English. However, only a fraction are native speakers. This raises the question of whether there is only one English or several 'Englishes'. In this module, you'll analyse the numerous varieties of English spoken around the world, and explore the linguistic properties, as well as the socio-cultural, political and educational variables influencing the shape, form and use of English. Starting with an overview of English in the British Isles, your focus will move across the Atlantic to look at variation within American English, before shifting to the varieties of English in the Commonwealth and former colonies. In the final part of the module, you'll explore the language of diasporas in English speaking countries and emerging hybrid languages. Throughout, you'll learn to analyse linguistic variation from a typological point of view by looking at real speech data from a variety of sources. For the assessment, you'll carry out a typological analysis, either of the varieties discussed in the seminar or of your own choice.
  • Language Acquisition: Topics and Issues
    On this module, you'll explore how we acquire a first language as children and the processes involved in learning a second. With more people needing to learn languages, or live a bilingual experience, it's essential to understand the mechanisms that operate in language-learning. You'll examine some of the raw data of learner language, and discover various explanatory theories of language acquisition (native and second language), assessing their relative merits. You'll also look at bilingualism and what can be learnt from the experience of bilinguals. You'll be taught through lectures and seminars. In weekly lectures, you'll learn about the topics that you'll explore in the subsequent seminar. This will involve group analysis of data, presentation of material that you've researched, and group discussion. Your assessment will take the form of a written assignment (3,000 words) with sub-components involving analysis as well as exposition.
  • Philosophies of Language and the Body
    In this module you will focus on language as a symbolic system and practice where meaning is produced and reproduced under specific cultural conditions and is characterised by fragmentation and conflict as much as by cohesion and consensus. You will relate the study of language to issues concerning, for example, identity, cultural power and domination, representation, and real life. You will explore post-structuralist critiques of linguistics, which may include theories of language as a means by which identity is produced through the interconnectedness of language and ideology. In addition, you will encounter the physical body not as ‘natural’ but as a linguistic phenomenon: where the body is a text to be read. Challenging binaries such as mind/body and biological/textual, you will query the role of language in creating bodies and the ways in which the flesh has been historically created through discourse. You will also look at the ways the body has transgressed these discourses. In examining the relationships between language, power and bodies, you will explore the links between language, power, knowledge, ‘truth’ and identity, and extend these links to ecological concerns and the connectedness of the human to the nonhuman and nature. You will learn to question how truth and knowledge are challenged in post-structuralist/ deconstructionist projects, and how this challenge can lead to what is known as posthuman ethics and the ecological revolution: currently known in linguistic philosophy as ‘ecosophy’. You will be expected to give short presentations in class, based on your preparatory reading. Your assessment will consist of a 2500 word essay, requiring you to make connections between different ideas explored in the module, and a supporting task.
  • Narrative in Global Cinema
    On this module you will explore the way stories are told in films from around the world. You will study key aspects of cinematic narrative structure, including order, duration, cause-and-effect patterns, and the distinction between fabula (story) and syuzhet (plot). You will also examine how character and voice are handled in film, the function of 'point of view', focalisation, and internal vs external characterisation. You will address theoretical aspects such as narrator and narratee, reception theory, suspense vs surprise, the key 'seven' narrative functions, narrative and genre, and the ideology of 'show vs tell'. You will analyse non-narrative (and anti-narrative) aspects of narratives, such as description, iconic shots, music, and other disruptive elements. You will also be thinking about the different roles of words (dialogue, text, sub-titles) and imagery. You will study all of these narrative topics with regard to global cinemas. You will compare and contrast mainstream commercial Hollywood movies with non-American examples, ask to what extent continuity narrative has become the dominant pattern across the globe, examine narrative structures that do not fit the mainstream model, and analyse the intersection of global narratives with diverse identity formations. You will view films and clips from various European countries and non-Western regions, in addition to co-productions and transnational examples. Your assessment will comprise a narrative analysis (1000 words) and a critical (2000 words).
  • Race, Racism and Cultural Identity
    On this module, you'll explore the sociology of 'race', racism and ethnic divisions. You'll consider three related themes: the social origins and significance of racial and ethnic divisions, the varied causes, contexts and consequences of racism and antiracism, and the cultural consequences of migration. Although your primary substantive focus will be on race relations in contemporary Britain, you will also draw insights from historical and international comparisons. You'll also attend a series of student-led workshops, in which you'll apply sociological knowledge and understanding to current questions of 'race' politics and policy. The topics of these workshop will relate to key module themes, such as: the collection and use of racialised data in the criminal justice system, debates about the usefulness of the concept of institutional racism, and globalised Islam.
  • Working in English and Media
    This module, with a focus on work experience, will help prepare you for targeted entry into the world of multimedia, film, television, cinema, radio, video, teaching, publishing, arts administration and related creative and cultural industries. You'll identify, negotiate and carry out a work placement, or produce a commissioned product, in a chosen area, with guidance from the relevant Course Leader and Module Leader, who will provide ongoing consultation, supervision and support in association with the University's Careers Service. You'll develop a portfolio and write a critical essay, both of which you'll submit at the end of the semester. Your portfolio should include: your CV; copies of a range of academic work (including a DVD showreel, where appropriate); evidence of extra-curricular activities; evidence of work experience. Presentation is crucial to your portfolio, and you should make use of all available multi-media when refining your work. This module will form part of your ongoing programme of Personal Development Planning.
  • Special Topic in Linguistics
    This Special Topic module gives you the opportunity to study a topic that will reflect the particular academic interests and/or research of the member of staff teaching it. The module enables you to extend your research of a specific subject area that you may have met earlier in your studies, and in which there is deemed to be scope for more reading, analysis and discussion. A topic may be the study of an aspect of the language system, or an area of applied linguistics, or may involve the interface of linguistics with other disciplines such as philosophy, sociology, psychology or cultural studies. As the designated topics vary from year-to-year you will need to consult with your tutors to check which topics are being offered. This information will be made public in good time for you to be able to make an informed choice. There are no formal lectures and the module is taught in seminars in which group discussion is encouraged. You will be expected to undertake reading and a preparatory task for each seminar, and to reflect on feedback from these tasks in producing your subsequent assignments. Assessment is by coursework portfolio, which may include a spoken element. The module contributes to employability by developing your communication and literacy skills, specifically the ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy, including listening and questioning.
  • Methods and Developments in TEFL
    This module will build upon and develop your practical classroom methodology, as covered on the TEFL 1 & 2 modules. You'll analyse and evaluate the nature of syllabus design and language teaching methodology, explore theories of both language and learning, and analyse and evaluate teaching methods of the past and present, along with their practical applications for the learner, teacher and language classroom. The methods you'll examine include those such as Communicative Language Teaching, task-based Language Teaching, and the Lexical Approach. You'll also consider the influence of theory and methodology on such areas as teaching grammar and language skills, and the approach to learner and teacher roles and learner errors. You'll be encouraged to discuss and evaluate a range of approaches and methods in order to inform your own teaching techniques, broaden your awareness of a wide range of methodologies, and develop the ability to approach past, current or future methodology in an informed and critical manner.
  • Intercultural Competence and Graduate Mobility
    This module will help you to understand the importance of intercultural competence, global citizenship and the human dynamics of international mobility after you've graduated. It'll give you an understanding of working in different arenas, the effect of culture shock, and the skills and knowledge needed to take up employment successfully in a different culture. You'll also consider the social and psychological factors influencing international organisations and analyse varying patterns of intercultural communication, helping you look confidently beyond national boundaries in the search for rewarding employment. You'll also gain some insight into graduate careers that involve professional mobility and intercultural competence. Your assessment is made up of a presentation and an essay.
  • Contemporary Fiction
    On this module, you'll study a range of fiction from 1990 onwards, examining formal and thematic issues and the relationships between them. You'll consider narrative experimentation (the recycling of old stories and forms, the representation of history) and the interrelated topics of voice, place and community. As there is inevitably an absence of established critical texts on the contemporary works studied, you'll also consider alternative methods of reading, alternative sources of critical opinion (academic journals, the internet, broadsheet and broadcast journalism), and the ways in which new novels demand and shape new criticism. You'll be assessed through a 3,000 word essay at the end of the semester.
  • Writing for Work
    This is a core PDP module for third year students on the BA International Business degree. It's also a specialist ESP English Language support module for undergraduate students studying in the Ashcroft International Business School and for others seeking a career in the business world in English Language Teaching or any other field where strategies for speaking and communicating are of particular relevance. You'll take advanced study and practice of written communication in business, preparing you for your future working life, increasing your awareness of your own strengths and skills, and developing your confidence in using written language in the business environment. You'll learn how to produce correspondence and reports used in business, including many aspects of recruitment and selection and data collection and analysis. You'll particularly focus on the use of functional phrases, register, tone, format and peer identification/correction of errors. Developing these skills will improve your self-confidence in dealing effectively with most situations requiring written responses in the workplace. In addition, you'll be asked to compare a variety of writing styles used in different cultures. You'll be assessed by a Portfolio of Coursework.

Optional modules available in levels 5 and 6

  • Anglia Language Programme
    The Anglia Language Programme allows you to study a foreign language as part of your course. You'll take one language module in the second semester of your first year in order to experience the learning of a new language. You must select a language you've never learnt before from the following: Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish.

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your progress through a combination of traditional assessment, such as essays, exams or oral presentations, and portfolios, which involve both theoretical and practical work. Most of our modules also include a practical element, such as a data analysis exercise, allowing you to apply your theoretical knowledge to ‘real’ situations.

Where you'll study

Your department and faculty

The Department of English and Media is a community of more than 800 students, exploring subjects that further their understanding of culture and communication in the global age, from film studies to applied linguistics. We focus on skills and knowledge valued by employers, and provide our students with valuable industry insight through our links with creative partners.

Our students take part in many activities to help prepare them for the future, like work placements, study abroad opportunities, talks by internationally acclaimed guest speakers, and research conferences. They even have the chance to get writing advice from our Royal Literary Fund Fellow.

We’re part of the Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences, a hub of creative and cultural innovation whose groundbreaking research has real social impact.

Where can I study?

Cambridge
Lord Ashcroft Building on our Cambridge campus

Our campus is close to the centre of Cambridge, often described as the perfect student city.

Explore our Cambridge campus

Study abroad options

You’ll be able to study abroad for a semester or two as part of our Erasmus exchange (supported by the European Union). This will let you experience English as a truly global phenomenon, and you’ll also get to practice your intercultural skills.

Our partner universities are located across Europe (in Spain, Italy, France and Turkey), and all of their English linguistics courses are taught in English. You can even choose to study the relevant language as one of your optional modules, helping you to better communicate with the locals.

Additional experiences like studying abroad increasingly help job applicants stand out from the crowd, and we encourage you to make use of these opportunities.

Fees & funding

Course fees

UK & EU students, 2016/17 (per year)

£9,000

International students, 2016/17 (per year)

£11,000

Fees statement 

Tuition fees for UK/EU students 2017/18 are currently set at £9,000. These fees are regulated by the UK government and may increase in line with government policy. There is a possible increase for the 2017/18 intake of 2.8% which would put the fees at £9,250.


How do I pay my fees?

Tuition fee loan

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Most English undergraduates take out a tuition fee loan with Student Finance England. The fees are then paid directly to us. The amount you repay each month is linked to your salary and repayments start in April after you graduate.

How to apply for a tuition fee loan

Paying upfront

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If you choose not to take out a loan you can pay your fees directly to us. There are two ways to do this: either pay in full, or through a three- or six-month instalment plan starting at registration.

How to pay your fees directly

International students

You must pay your fees up-front, in full or in instalments. You will also be asked for a deposit or sponsorship letter for undergraduate courses. Details will be in your offer letter.

Paying your fees
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Funding for UK & EU students

We offer most new undergraduate students funding to support their studies and university life. There’s also finance available for specific groups of students.

Grants and scholarships are available for:

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Funding for international students

We've a number of scholarships, as well as some fee discounts for early payment.

Entry requirements

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Important additional notes

Our published entry requirements are a guide only and our decision will be based on your overall suitability for the course as well as whether you meet the minimum entry requirements. Other equivalent qualifications may be accepted for entry to this course, please email answers@anglia.ac.uk for further information.

We don't accept AS level qualifications on their own for entry to our undergraduate degree courses. However for some degree courses a small number of tariff points from AS levels are accepted as long as they're combined with tariff points from A levels or other equivalent level 3 qualifications in other subjects.

Entry requirements are for September 2016. Entry requirements for other intakes may differ.

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International students

We welcome applications from international and EU students, and accept a range of international qualifications.

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English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you'll need to make sure you meet our English language requirements for undergraduate courses.

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Improving your English language skills

If you don't meet our English language requirements, we offer a range of courses which could help you achieve the level required for entry onto a degree course.

We also provide our own English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT) in the UK and overseas. To find out if we are planning to hold an ELPT in your country, contact our country managers.

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Get more information

UK & EU applicants

01245 68 68 68

Enquire online

International applicants

+44 1245 68 68 68

Enquire online