Criminology and Sociology BA (Hons)

Full-time undergraduate (3 years)

Cambridge

September 2016

code: L390

Available in Clearing call now 01223 698444


Overview

Combine Criminology and Sociology to improve your understanding of some of the most pressing issues today. Study crime and social issues both in and outside the lecture room, and gain an enhanced understanding of current debates. You’ll graduate with skills for employment in areas as diverse as policing, probation, youth offending and government.

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Full description

Careers

Our graduates find success in many fulfilling careers, such as probation officers and prison-based probation service officers with the National Probation Service; various roles with the police, including crime scene and victim liaison officers; prison officers and governors with the Prison Service; researchers and policy analysts with the Home Office; and other employers including the Crown Prosecution Service; the Court Service; youth offending teams/youth work and Crime Reduction Partnerships.

Other graduates now enjoy careers in journalism and the media, business administration and management, health management, teaching, social care and social research.

During your degree, you’ll have many opportunities to engage with potential employers, thanks to our excellent links with agencies such as Cambridgeshire Police, National Crime Agency and the Probation Service.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules

  • Adventures in Crime News and Criminology
    This module will invite you to question how crime and deviance have shaped our thoughts, drawing on its portrayal in news media. It will introduce you to concepts that contribute to the social construction of crime, such as 'newsworthiness', 'criminogenic media' and moral panics, as well as some basic building blocks of criminology itself. You'll examine and discuss the types of crimes prevalent in news media and consider current criminal justice issues and cases. You'll also decipher official statistics, such as those emerging from the British Crime Survey, police-recorded crime and conviction data, in order to establish a balanced view of the extent of crime in England and Wales. You'll examine crime data (statistics, case studies, crime rates etc) and the sources from which they're gathered. Such data analysis will provide a framework for contextualising material that is frequently misrepresented in the media within an academic and realistic context.
  • Adventures in Criminal Justice
    Building on Adventures in Crime News and Criminology, Adventures in Criminal Justice will introduce you to the somewhat abstract components of the Criminal Justice process. You'll explore and analyse sections of the Criminal Justice System, paying particular attention to how it fits together (under the National Offender Management System - NOMS) within five main sub-systems: Law Enforcement, Courts, Youth Justice, Prison and Probation. Each week, you'll examine and develop a portfolio relating to the following issues within the criminal justice system: freedom, human rights, net-widening, retribution, rehabilitation, politics and prevention of crime. This portfolio will provide an opportunity for you to recognise and critically evaluate the effectiveness of the criminal justice process, based on contested evidence and research. As a result, you'll be able to demonstrate a critical appreciation of the complicated position and treatment of offenders in England and Wales, as well as the challenges faced by policy-makers and criminal justice staff.
  • The Sociological Imagination
    Sociology focuses on the relations that connect individuals, groups and institutions within societies. This module will introduce you to the sociological 'cast of mind' and allow you to explore the specific contribution of sociology to understanding the past, present and possible futures of modern societies. The module is divided into two parts: 'sociological thinking' and 'sociology in action'. In the first part you’ll look at the theories of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim and Max Weber. You'll examine how these thinkers analyse work, power and politics, as well as how they each seek to explain and remedy the social and psychological burdens placed on individuals who live in modern societies. The second part of the module will introduce you to the ways in which sociologists combine theory and research to make sense of contemporary social life.
  • The Sociology of Globalisation
    This module will introduce you to concepts of globalisation. You'll be asked to consider how your daily life is affected by processes of globalisation and think critically about theoretical approaches to these processes. You'll cover the various dimensions of globalisation on a lecture-by-lecture basis, also exploring connections between topics. These dimensions/topics will include hard vs. soft globalisation; the globalised economy; the impact of globalisation on the nation-state; migration and diaspora; popular culture and patterns of consumption; and globalisation and ecology. You'll be assessed through submission of a 3,000 word essay.

Year one, optional modules

  • Political Ideologies and Social Controversies
    This module will give you a grounding in major political ideologies and key political concepts for your future study in practical and theoretical aspects of social science. By studying the core elements of ideologies, you'll have the opportunity to engage in basic comparative study and some degree of historical analysis. You'll then use this understanding of key political ideologies to explore different political environments. You'll reflect on forms of classical political thought and locate these in contemporary political settings. Your assessment will be in the form of a 1,000 word critical analysis and a 2000-word essay.
  • Media and Crime
    Media representations of crime, law and order have always been a matter of public interest, as well as debate amongst people involved in the criminal justice system. You'll explore the ways in which media shapes our perception of crime, and form an overview of the theoretical perspectives on media within criminology. You'll also examine the construction of crime news and the role of politics and ideology, and learn about the concept of "moral panics. Throughout the module, you'll use case studies, reports, and theory, selecting one or more case studies to develop your analytical skills, as well as your presentation skills. You can use case studies to build a foundation for your essay, in which you'll evaluate the debates about the relationship between media and crime, as well as public perceptions of crime.

Year two, core modules

  • Trials and Errors
    Trials and Errors will introduce you to the concept of miscarriages of justice and wrongful conviction. Each week, you will learn about some of the key barriers to ‘justice’ and critically examine controversial aspects of the criminal justice system; for example the mass production of guilty pleas, jury trials, expert witnesses and ‘trial by media’. You will draw upon a range of case studies to examine these issues, developing a theoretical understanding that is rooted in real-world examples. By the end of Trials and Errors, you will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the court process and how it can go wrong, as well as the strength and weaknesses of key aspects of the English and Welsh system. Trials and Errors will be delivered in weekly two hour lecture/workshops and one hour seminars. You will have the opportunity to present your ideas in class. Your assessment will comprise an essay and an in-class test.
  • Social Research Methods
    This hands-on module will help you develop the practical skills to carry out research in the social sciences. You'll focus on developing evaluative skills and practical competence in both qualitative and quantitative methods. You'll further your ability to critically assess the published research findings encountered in your reading for other modules, and to select and apply appropriate methods in dissertations or projects as well as future employment. The assignment will allow you to generate and analyse data that addresses the same issue using different methodologies. For the qualitative part of the research report, you'll devise and carry out a semi-structured interview, then analyse the interview transcripts using manual methods. You'll choose data-generation methods, put these methods into practice in a small pilot study, analyse the results, reflect on the experience and draw conclusions. The second part will introduce you to key quantitative techniques commonly used by social researchers. You'll discover the processes involved in the structured questionnaire method, which is needed to generate a relatively large dataset. You'll learn the methodology required to translate research questions into a questionnaire format, then carry out a pilot questionnaire survey and critically analyse the practical experience.
  • Retribution, Restoration and Rehabilitation
    On this module, you'll examine the proper aims and objectives of punishment and the role of rehabilitation in correcting criminal behaviour, focusing on the three core ideas of retribution, rehabilitation and restoration. You'll discover how, by taking a specific theoretical line, certain public policy measures are implied, and explore the roots of the sanctions we take for granted, such as the birth of the prison and the demise (in some countries) of the death penalty. You'll consider the impact of penal direction-changes, the emergence of rehabilitation as a 'model' and the growth of the 'penal industry' throughout the western world. You'll also examine some of the theories that have been generated to understand and direct various responses to unruly behaviour: the utilitarian tradition, the retributive tradition, just deserts, proportionality, rehabilitation, deterrence, restoration and reparation. You'll be assessed through an essay and a report in an agreed area.
  • Violent Crime
    On this module, you'll approach the study of violence from a range of perspectives, including criminal and legal, psychological, medical and biological. You'll explore a range of expressions of violence, and the sanctions that are employed through the criminal justice system, as well as examining the concept of evil and how rehabilitation or punishments relate to such an idea. You'll debate 'ordinary' and criminal aggression - from everyday assaults to serial murder - and examine these behaviours through a variety of theoretical explanations, such as vengeance, mass media, drugs, social context and biological impairment. In addition, you'll have the chance to evaluate the impact of research into the unplanned effects of aggression or 'legitimate force' in situations such as war and sport, as well as 'illegitimately', such as the aftermath of accidental injuries or deaths. Your assessment will take the form of an essay and a portfolio, including a structured classroom debate.

Year two, optional modules

  • Social Divisions
    On this module you'll consider the dynamics of inequality and difference in the contemporary world. Focusing on the interplay of divisions of class, gender, ethnicity and age, you'll explore four key themes: continuity and change in patterns of social inequality and identity; the developing economic, political and cultural context; the relationship between global processes and varied, localised patterns and experiences of inequality; and the sometimes complex relationship between material inequalities and social and political identities. After a broad conceptual introduction, you'll study a series of case studies of contemporary social divisions. For your assessment, you'll research and present material on a chosen case study and include this in an essay, relating it to wider patterns of social division.
  • Knowledge and Belief
    On this module you'll consider the argument that, since the turn of the 20th century, different forms of knowledge have transformed not only the way in which we understand the social and natural worlds but the very nature of our lives. You'll begin by evaluating Max Weber's distinction between formal and substantive rationality and his claim that, since the start of the last century, formal rationality has undermined other human value systems. In relation to this, you'll consider what consequences the rise of bureaucratic and rational processes has had upon traditional faith-based beliefs. In the second part of the module, you'll focus upon two issues of debate in contemporary social and philosophical theory: the progress of science and technology and debates concerning the modern and the post-modern. Your assessment will comprise of a group presentation and a 2,000 word essay.
  • Policing and Crime Control
    Laws don't have an impact unless they're enforced, or unless there is an anticipation of enforcement. The Police is the most visible of enforcement agencies and organisations, and debates and controversies about their role in society are never far from legal, political and public attention. On this module, you'll reflect on some of the key sociological and political issues surrounding the maintenance of social order. You'll consider the development of the police and their contemporary role, and examine continuities and changes in public attitudes and expectations of the police, as well as the impact of technological and organisational changes in styles of policing and maintaining social order. You'll consider the growth of paramilitary-style policing, as well as community policing initiatives. You may take part in a local field trip to see an element of police training that will form the basis of one of your assessment tasks. Your assessment will take the form of a patchwork submission comprising five elements: a review of a key text; a critical analysis of policing styles; a summary of a documentary; an observation/reflection on an element of police learning and development; and an in-class test.
  • Cultures of War
    The media is saturated with reports of war, ethnic and political conflict in various countries around the world. Whilst there are rules of engagement for war, crimes are nevertheless committed during conflicts. On this module, you'll consider and evaluate the concept of 'war', through the conduct of governments and international bodies as well as combatants and non-combatants. Through a 'Cultural Criminological' lens, you'll examine the causes of war and crimes committed in conflict-torn environments. Is war a natural consequence of human interaction? Is there a difference between a 'terrorist' and a 'freedom fighter'? Are there effective methods for resolving global conflicts? You'll explore some historical, political, legal and sociological explanations of combat, conflict and political unrest, agendas as well as the impact of patriotism, nationalism and fanaticism. You'll examine theories of war, rules of armed conflict and the roles of international courts and tribunals, and evaluate crimes and weapons of war, as well as representations of war in the media (including the 'war on drugs' and 'war on terror'), conflict prevention and effective peace processes. You'll be encouraged to draw upon contemporary materials, and to keep up with recent media coverage of events. Whilst lectures will be given, the module is run mainly as an interactive seminar/workshop, so you'll need to prepare and participate. You'll be assessed through essays, one of them will be time constrained.
  • Social Theory
    On this module, you'll discuss the contribution of key social theories to our understanding of the distinguishing features of modern societies, individuals, changing social structures and processes of modernity and 'post-modernity'. The key themes you'll consider will include: sociological perspectives and debates on the self and identity; sociological debates on social power and authority; changing sociological conceptions. You’ll look at how sociological knowledge can contribute to our understanding of contemporary social and political issues. The theorists that you'll study may include Habermas, Bourdieu, Giddens and Foucault. You'll be assessed through a research essay of 3,000 words.
  • Contemporary Work and Organisational Life
    This module will give you an in-depth analysis of contemporary theories and key issues related to work and organisations from a sociological perspective. You'll focus on major organisational and technological changes in industrialised societies such as McDonaldization, debureaucratisation, delayering, the information revolution, post-Fordism, de-skilling and professionalisation. These are linked to broader social transformations: the decline of manufacturing industries and the rise of the service sector in the West, the rationalisation of public services, and the global triumph of capitalism. You'll investigate the impact of these changes on workplace structures, experiences and opportunities at work, and the relative strength of work identities. You'll also consider whether individuals in industrialised societies now have a greater potential to choose, map out, and control their work biographies. You'll be assessed through a mid-semester class test and a case study.
  • Theories of Deviance, Crime and Social Control
    On this module, you'll explore explanations of deviant behaviour throughout the 20th century and theories of crime that are of both historical interest and contemporary relevance, identifying and policing the parameters of 'normality' in late modern, Western society. You'll also look at specific questions relating to the transgression of social norms and whether it is the result of specific environments. You'll not only gain a historical understanding of social explanations, but also learn to demonstrate the relevance of these theories to contemporary understandings of deviance and social control. You'll also explore Labelling Theory and Radical or Marxist Criminological theories, as well as more practical or policy oriented views of both Right and Left Realism, before going on to look at two recent and very influential approaches to understanding crime. You’ll then focus on the role of "power" and social control, and the role of "culture" and the recent work of cultural criminologists. Your assessment will comprise of a test and an essay.
  • Sociology of Education
    This module will introduce you to key sociological perspectives on schooling and education. Schooling systems and strategies are instrumental in shaping individual and collective identities, and in reflecting and reinforcing dominant societal values. On this module, you'll engage with the central scholarly and political debates that surround these issues. More specifically, you'll explore how experiences of schooling are shaped by social dimensions such as class, gender, ethnicity and sexuality. You'll consider the basic functions of education, before exploring topics such as the micro-politics of everyday school life; higher education; employability and the knowledge economy; schooling and the negotiation of masculinities and femininities; schooling and sexuality; and schooling, ethnicity and whiteness. Your assessment for this module will be a 3,000 word essay.
  • Learning from Work Experience (incorporates work placements)
    This module will prepare you for the transition from education to work by helping you apply skills gained through your studies in a practical way, and by investigating possible careers for which your degree would be relevant. Through 70 hours of work experience, you'll explore how work and learning interact, increasing your employability by improving your sector knowledge, self-reliance and confidence. Appropriate work placements will give you the relevant experience in sectors and roles in which social science students are likely to find future employment, such as the Citizen's Advice Bureau. Your work placement will be accompanied by an agreement between you, your employer and the module leader. You'll then apply your sociological knowledge, skills and concepts to the analysis of your work experience. You'll also produce a reflective workplace diary, logging activity and supporting an analysis of the learning achieved in the report. You'll also attend a series of workshops to support your work, and receive supervision from the Module Leader or Tutor.
  • Crime and Place: Geographic Criminology and Crime mapping
    Criminologists have long been interested in the role that place plays in the distribution and nature of crime. Over the last 200 years, scholars have been producing crime maps to explore the important relationship between the environment and criminal behaviour. Such crime and place studies now fall under the academic umbrella of Environmental (or geographic) Criminology. On this module, you’ll look at the issues and concepts central to an understanding of geographic or environmental criminology. In the first part, you'll consider key definitions, issues and concepts associated with the field, before going on to look at the history of crime mapping and its evolution to the present day. From there, you'll examine crime patterns at various spatial scales, and how offenders use the environment, exploring various theories and models that have been put forward to explain the processes involved in offence location selection. Finally, you'll look at the role that spatial approaches can play in crime prevention, operational policing and geographic profiling. You'll need to contribute each week, primarily through the completion of practical tasks and exercises. These exercises will use actual case studies designed to familiarise you with the principles and theories central to an understanding of this field.
  • Project Preparation
    This module will provide you with the guidance, support and information to prepare for the major project (or part thereof) in your final year. The topics you cover will largely be built around your own academic needs and interests, and may vary from year to year. However, you'll also attend weekly sessions, which will include guidance on the following: appropriate use of supervisor; selecting a suitable topic and researching research problems; literature surveys and reviews on chosen topics; how to develop research aims and objectives; ethics and writing a research proposal.

Year three, core modules

  • Major Project
    The individual Major Project will allow you to undertake a substantial piece of individual research, focused on a topic relevant to your specific course. Your topic will be assessed for suitability to ensure sufficient academic challenge and satisfactory supervision by an academic member of staff. The project will require you to identify/formulate problems and issues, conduct research, evaluate information, process data, and critically appraise and present your findings/creative work. You should arrange and attend regular meetings with your project supervisor, to ensure that your project is closely monitored and steered in the right direction.
  • Comparative Criminal justice
    On this module, you'll examine the ways that crime and offending behaviour has been managed during the last hundred years in different countries and how jurisdictions deal with the main stages and elements in the criminal justice process, from crime rates and policing through to sentencing. You'll explore examples from all over the world, with a particular focus on Europe, the UK, the United States and Australasia. By documenting, analysing and contextualising criminal justice processes and institutions elsewhere and comparing them to more familiar settings, you'll gain a broader understanding of criminal justice, as well as specific knowledge about other jurisdictions. Your assessment will comprise of a conference-style presentation.
  • Race, Racism and Cultural Identity
    On this module, you'll explore the sociology of 'race', racism and ethnic divisions. You'll consider three related themes: the social origins and significance of racial and ethnic divisions, the varied causes, contexts and consequences of racism and antiracism, and the cultural consequences of migration. Although your primary substantive focus will be on race relations in contemporary Britain, you will also draw insights from historical and international comparisons. You'll also attend a series of student-led workshops, in which you'll apply sociological knowledge and understanding to current questions of 'race' politics and policy. The topics of these workshop will relate to key module themes, such as: the collection and use of racialised data in the criminal justice system, debates about the usefulness of the concept of institutional racism, and globalised Islam.

Year three, optional modules

  • Invisible Crimes
    The crimes committed by corporate entities, or those individuals within them, often have a more profound economic, physical and social cost on individuals than those associated with 'conventional' criminal behaviour. The way corporate entities experience the process of criminal justice differs from the experience of individuals and despite increasing media interest, it's often difficult to obtain convictions against businesses that break the law. On this module, you'll explore the difficulty in defining corporate, white-collar and organised crime, and how they have been addressed by criminologists. You'll consider the links in the crime-power-media relationship, examining them through case studies, as well as texts and theories to understand the broader context. For your assignment, you'll select a case related to the subject and critically evaluate its development.
  • Sex, Sex Offending and Society
    Sexual offences occupy a unique position in contemporary society and are a major concern for governments, academics, policy analysts and pressure groups around the world, yet the problem remains little understood and inadequately addressed. On this module, you'll examine the way certain activities have come to be defined and regulated as sex crimes and how particular definitions generate specific legal responses and treatments. You'll explore legal, policy and practice responses and you’ll look at sexual offending from the perspectives of offenders themselves, victims, society and the law. You'll also explore the prostitution has been criminalised; the potential of the internet and how technologies contribute to the increasingly problematic policing of sexually explicit materials; and aspects of the international sex trade, in particular the problem of human trafficking. Your assessment will comprise a portfolio, including either an analysis of current policy or an analysis of the portrayal of sex-related crimes through the media.
  • Sexuality and Social Control
    On this module, you'll explore the range of discursive practices used to explain sex and sexuality in Western culture. You'll examine long-standing claims about the 'naturalness' of heterosexuality as a reproductive drive linked to the survival and reproduction of the human 'species', and the implications of this for the gendered sexual order, various non-conventional sexualities and particular social groups. Drawing on a 'social constructionist' approach, you'll examine religious, biological, psychological and sociological explanations of sexuality. You'll uncover how sex and sexuality are understood, practised and regulated, and in doing so, expose the ideological and discursive foundations of ideas about sex and sexuality in relation to gender, ethnicity, age and disability. You’ll look at how ideas about sex and sexuality are shaped historically, how they vary cross-culturally and how they impact on us as individuals and members of particular social groups. You'll be assessed through a 3,000 word essay.
  • Sport, Globalisation and International politics
    This module will develop your understanding of the relationship between sport, processes of globalisation, and the sphere of international politics. Broadly speaking, the key themes that you'll consider are ideology, power and control. More specifically, you'll be introduced to a set of key theoretical and conceptual insights relating to globalisation, nationalism and commercialisation early in the module. In later lectures and seminars, you'll apply these insights to particular instances from the sporting world. Specific topics you'll consider include 'race' and racism in sport; the Workers' Sport movement, the role of sport in the colonisation of Africa, the history and politics of FIFA, and a number of national case studies including Catalonia and South Africa. You'll be assessed through a 3,000 word essay.
  • Sociology of Popular Culture
    On this module, you'll look at various contested definitions of 'popular culture' and consider the role it plays in contemporary lives. You'll engage with a range of critical perspectives on popular culture. Some theorists suggest that it is an inferior or 'dumbed down' form of culture, including Matthew Arnold and the Leavises, through to the Frankfurt School of social theorists, and to key writers in the British culturalist tradition. You'll also examine more recent trends in theorising popular culture including globalisation, 'glocalisation' and 'Americanisation'. You’ll look at structuralist and post-structuralist semiotics as well as the theories of Gramsci and more latterly writers such as Barthes, Fiske and Eco. You'll apply these ideas to areas such as popular music and youth subcultures. You'll also look at the relationships between popular culture and gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity before considering how postmodern theories might contribute to our understanding of 'the popular'.
  • Feminist Theory and Practice
    This module will allow you to explore the development of feminist theory and practice from the early 20th century, with a particular focus on the period from the 1960s to the present. You'll predominantly cover British and North American feminism, but will also consider perspectives and activism from other global regions. You'll explore and locate different feminist perspectives including liberal, socialist, intersectional, post-structuralist and post-feminism, but with a particular focus on radical feminism. You'll explore these perspectives in relation to key topics that have been central to feminist struggles, such as the family; male violence against women; concepts of masculinity and femininity; sexuality and reproductive rights; media representation; employment and participation in public life. The key themes include: - Feminist strategies, activism and impact - Men's roles and relationship to feminism - Current issues and the future of feminism. You'll be taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, and will need to read in preparation for the seminars. Within seminar discussions, you'll assume collective responsibility for applying course material to a specific area of social life in order to elucidate the development of feminist theory and practice within it, and taking such collective responsibility will be an explicit theme of class discussion throughout the module. Your assessment for this module will take the form of a 500-word case study summary and an essay of a maximum 2,500 words.
  • Youth Justice Controversies
    The Criminal Justice System incorporates a range of functions and agencies that are required to protect the public, uphold justice and the law, maintain public order, exact punishments and censures, recognise and accommodate victims and sustain public confidence. The system is guided by important principles, of which a central aspect is that every individual has rights, whether as suspect, defendant, convict, enforcer, employee, victim, witness or ordinary citizen. On this module, you'll uncover the complexities of the criminal justice system, notably around the issue of youth justice, and discuss theories explaining youth crime and youth culture. You'll analyse competing strategies in youth justice and their outcomes, discussing recent developments in youth justice legislation, policy and practice. You'll reflect on the issue of race, gender and drug abuse, and explore the recent youth justice innovations that have arguably changed the face of young offenders and issues of accountability. Your assessment will comprise a group presentation and a portfolio of patchwork texts.
  • Investigative Psychology
    The psychological study of crime, criminals and victims within a legal framework is known as criminal or forensic psychology. On this module, you'll examine the role that psychology and psychological perspectives can play in the criminal justice process, paying particular attention to the application of psychology to police investigations including the collection, examination and use of investigative information and evidence, as well as to the role of the psychologist in the court room. You'll explore the different ways criminal psychologists contribute to police training, investigations and interviewing as well as their contribution to understanding evidence in the courtroom and how juries process that evidence. You'll also examine and evaluate the challenges and pitfalls of giving such advice. You’ll look at actual case studies designed to familiarise you with the types of criminal cases and associated outputs produced by criminal psychologists in a real world setting. You'll be assessed by way of a poster presentation on an aspect of offender profiling and through a profiling method evaluation.
  • Preparing for Work
    This module will act as a bridge between your higher education and future employment. Your learning achievements will be evaluated, identifying their strengths, weakness and skills and preparing you for the next step in your career in an orderly and planned fashion. You'll be assessed through submission of a progress file that demonstrates your achievements in Higher Education, either in printed form or as an e-portfolio.
  • Concepts of Good and Evil
    What role, if any, does the concept of evil play in our moral vocabulary? Is it a narrowly theological notion or does it usefully describe certain kinds of act and/or character? On this module, you'll examine contemporary accounts of evil, as well as looking at the concept of evil in the history of philosophy from Leibniz to the present. In addition to considering theoretical discussions of evil, you'll also consider phenomena such as war and terrorism and ask whether the concept of evil helps us to understand them.
  • Nature and Society
    On this module, you'll explore the relationship between social and natural worlds and, in the process, consider sociological debates about how best to engage with biological knowledge. You'll look at how sociological approaches can take account of the ways in which people are at once social and biological beings, how the natural environment can constrain and enable personal and social development and how ideas about 'nature' feature in contemporary social, cultural and political life. You’ll consider the importance of recent developments in the life sciences and how they may challenge existing views and experiences of self, life and kinship. These are some of the issues you'll consider in relation to three case studies: biocitizenship, biology and group difference, and global warming.

Optional modules available all years

  • Anglia Language Programme
    The Anglia Language Programme allows you to study a foreign language as part of your course. You'll take one language module in the second semester of your first year in order to experience the learning of a new language. You must select a language you've never learnt before from the following: Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods, allowing you to develop important transferable skills. You’ll show your progress through a mixture of case studies, presentations, essays, patchwork texts (short pieces of writing, or ‘patches’, built up week-by-week), portfolios, poster presentations, data analysis exercises, exams and group projects, as well as an individual Major Project.

We know how important helpful feedback is and embed opportunities for formative feedback into our modules so you can make the best progress possible.

Where you'll study

Your department and faculty

The Department of Humanities and Social Sciences is an academic community of nearly 800 students and teaching staff. Our students are supported by leading practitioners, so you'll always have access to the latest theoretical and practical knowledge, as well as invaluable career advice. Subjects in the Humanities and Social Sciences lead to work in many roles you might not have considered, maybe as a politician, chief executive – or even an inventor.

We organise many activities to help our students prepare for their future, like work placements, study abroad opportunities, talks by acclaimed guest speakers, and research conferences.

We’re part of the Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences, a hub of creative and cultural innovation whose groundbreaking research has real social impact.

Where can I study?

Cambridge
Lord Ashcroft Building on our Cambridge campus

Our campus is close to the centre of Cambridge, often described as the perfect student city.

Explore our Cambridge campus

Field trips

You’ll have the chance to go on field trips abroad as well as visiting courts and prisons in England. In recent years our students have travelled to Amsterdam, Estonia, the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland, and the Old Bailey in London.

Fees & funding

Course fees

UK & EU students, 2016/17 (per year)

£9,000

International students, 2016/17 (per year)

£11,000

Fees statement 

Tuition fees for UK/EU students 2017/18 are currently set at £9,000. These fees are regulated by the UK government and may increase in line with government policy. There is a possible increase for the 2017/18 intake of 2.8% which would put the fees at £9,250.


How do I pay my fees?

Tuition fee loan

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Most English undergraduates take out a tuition fee loan with Student Finance England. The fees are then paid directly to us. The amount you repay each month is linked to your salary and repayments start in April after you graduate.

How to apply for a tuition fee loan

Paying upfront

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If you choose not to take out a loan you can pay your fees directly to us. There are two ways to do this: either pay in full, or through a three- or six-month instalment plan starting at registration.

How to pay your fees directly

International students

You must pay your fees up-front, in full or in instalments. You will also be asked for a deposit or sponsorship letter for undergraduate courses. Details will be in your offer letter.

Paying your fees
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Funding for UK & EU students

We offer most new undergraduate students funding to support their studies and university life. There’s also finance available for specific groups of students.

Grants and scholarships are available for:

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Funding for international students

We've a number of scholarships, as well as some fee discounts for early payment.

Entry requirements

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Important additional notes

Our published entry requirements are a guide only and our decision will be based on your overall suitability for the course as well as whether you meet the minimum entry requirements. Other equivalent qualifications may be accepted for entry to this course, please email answers@anglia.ac.uk for further information.

All tariff points must come from A levels. Points from AS levels cannot be counted towards the total tariff points required for entry to this course.

Entry requirements are for September 2016 entry. Entry requirements for other intakes may differ.

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International students

We welcome applications from international and EU students, and accept a range of international qualifications.

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English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you'll need to make sure you meet our English language requirements for undergraduate courses.

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Improving your English language skills

If you don't meet our English language requirements, we offer a range of courses which could help you achieve the level required for entry onto a degree course.

We also provide our own English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT) in the UK and overseas. To find out if we are planning to hold an ELPT in your country, contact our country managers.

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