Computer Science BSc (Hons)

Full-time undergraduate (3 years)

College of West Anglia


code: G400

Apply via UCAS


Develop the knowledge and skills you need to create technologies and applications that will change the world. Developed with leading employers, this course will fully prepare you for a fast-paced, rewarding career.

Untitled Page
Full description


Our graduates go on to successful careers in many industries and fields including software development, database administration, networking, web and support. The qualification provides an ideal basis for postgraduate study or research.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules

  • Fundamentals of Design
    You’ll be introduced to the concepts of a software life cycle, system theory, design methodologies and relational data modelling. Our module uses a system methodology to work through a software lifecycle looking at analysis, design and implementation. You’ll be given the opportunity to apply a design methodology to a case study producing diagrammatic representations of the data and functionality of a system. You’ll be introduced to the essentials of database design and implementation. You’ll be expected to participate in group work as well as make individual contributions. Our module is 100% coursework, comprising a set of deliverables to demonstrate analysis of the case study example(s) and application of design theory. Exercises will be both formative and summative to encourage discussion of design theory and its application.
  • Introduction to Programming
    This module provides an introduction to high level programming, requiring no prior programming experience. You'll use industry-standard tools and techniques to design, implement, test and document simple programs using a current programming language such as C#, Java or C++. You'll understand the principal components of a high-level program, laying the foundation for subsequent modules requiring structured programming ability. It emphasises the principles of good programming practice and introduce the techniques required to develop software which is robust, usable and efficient. By the end of the module you'll have sufficient mastery of a high-level programming language to allow them to design, implement and test simple programs. The skills taught within the module are directly transferable to the workplace and to provide a suitable foundation to apply programming skills in your later studies and future career.
  • Computer Systems
    With the use of computers in all walks of life it's essential for companies to have IT staff capable of specifying, installing, configuring and maintaining the company's IT resources and networks. This module ensures you'll have the practical skills companies look for in an IT specialist. We'll investigate the components and operation of modern computer systems and introduce you to the hardware components which enable a computer to process data and the devices which enable data to be input, output and stored. We'll also introduce you to the fundamentals of computer networks as modern computer systems rarely operate in a standalone manner.
  • Operating Systems
    You'll be introduced to the fundamental features of modern operating systems, their components and their use. You'll learn key concepts including the kernel, memory and resource management, security and authentication and command line and graphical user interfaces (GUI). Case studies will be used to familiarise you with the history and features of Windows/MS-DOS and Linux/Unix. The module will also introduce you to the command line interface (CLI) commands and scripting in both the Windows CLI and a Linux shell and allow you to develop simple scripts to automate activities in both operating system environments. It'll also explain how each operating system stores configuration information and how (particularly in Linux/Unix) scripts can be used to modify that system configuration. The skills acquired in the module will enable you to go on to study modules which involve topics such as system administration, network and server configuration and technical support all of which are key skills graduates need when working in the systems and network support industries.
  • Design for the Internet
    If you’re anticipating a career in information systems or programming, the knowledge of website construction, whether that is for the internet or a company intranet, is a valuable asset. Our module provides you with the knowledge required to build a standards compliant web site. The website will be a blend of XHTML, Cascading Style Sheet and a scripting language. You’ll also be expected to submit documentation containing an introduction, descriptions of the purpose and aims of the web site. You’ll choose a subject for the website. The knowledge you’ll gain in this module will form the foundation for further web-based study in areas such as graphic design, user perceptions of the usability and quality of web pages and multimedia/database websites.

Year two, core modules

  • Software Engineering
    The number, size, and application domains of computer applications have grown and most people depend on the effectiveness of software development. Software products have to be efficient, good quality and to help us to be more efficient and productive. Software Engineering is a form of engineering that applies the principles of computer science and mathematics to achieving cost-effective solutions to software problems. Get real-world experience in software engineering and gain the intellectual tools to be able to design, implement and test software systems. Build on Fundamentals of Design and Introduction to Programming and journey through all the phases of the life cycle by taking case studies and building real software applications based on them. You’ll use CASE tools to study topics, including analysis and design in UML and managing the OO software development process. Finally, you’ll work in team on a specific project to create an application from a case study that showcases a whole software lifecycle.
  • Network Routing
    The global internet is a collection of networks, termed Autonomous Systems (AS), that are linked together by high-speed communication links provided by telecommunication organisations. Converged traffic, that is traffic comprising both data and voice, is routed through the network based either on policies agreed between ASs or performance metrics by routers within the ASs. Due to the complexity and dynamic nature of networks, routers use dynamic routing protocols to establish the 'best' path for traffic. You'll focus on the key concepts and protocols of network routing. You'll cover basic routing constructs such as: static and default routing; Interior Gateway Protocols (IGP) such as RIP, EIGRP and OSPF and introduces the Exterior Gateway Protocol BGP that is primarily used by Internet Service Providers. Classes involve a mixture of theory, delivered through a series of lectures, and practical implementation, delivered through a series of guided laboratory exercises. We'll use advanced network simulation tools and industry standard router platforms to teach hands-on skills. This module forms part of the curriculum offered by The Cisco Networking Academy Program, a well-established partnership between academia and industry to provide up-to-date knowledge and skills required by industry and commerce. You'll be able to access on-line material via the university Virtual Learning Environment and access our laboratories remotely.
  • Database Design and Implementation
    You’ll be guided through the fundamentals of database design. This grounding will enable you to construct small scale industrial quality databases. You’ll work in groups emulating real world development teams. As part of this you’ll learn the skills of constructing documentation, making revisions and delivering work to a deadline. Implicitly you’ll learn the skill of managing a group environment. This module begins with the development of an acceptable approach to industrial clients and their problems. Working within the specification given, you’ll learn how to extract data from interviews and paperwork. You can then progress to designing and building a database, querying the database to provide the reports (including statistics) that a customer needs. During this process the current industrial choice database language (SQL) is learned. The assessment comprises the design, production and querying of a database and the completion of a portfolio of coursework to be submitted at the end of the course.
  • Network Services Engineering
    Network configuration is one of the key skills needed by IT professionals in order to pursue a successful career in computer support. We'll teach you the fundamentals of the hardware, software and standards used by modern computer networks. Using a mixture of theoretical discussion and application of new skills in a practical environment you'll gain an understanding of the complexities of modern networks and their operation and to permit you to evaluate existing environments and advise on new network scenarios. In practical sessions you'll be able to experiment with the configuration and implementation of common network services, such as NFS, electronic mail, ftp, ssh, SAMBA.
  • Interaction and Usability
    Developing an effective human-computer interface and improving the user experience is a vital yet poorly understood area. This module will develop your understanding of interaction design by using core theory applied to the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation of a limited functionality horizontal prototype. Please note that you’ll be expected to have some scripting experience prior to starting the module. If you're interested in web design or designing interfaces, want to become a usability consultant, testing consultant, or work within user training or user support roles, then you'll find this module considerably beneficial.
  • Computing Research Methods
    This module will provide you with experience of topic-specific research and the analysis and application of that work in order to carry out a computer science based project in your final year. We'll help with the selection of a suitable project, often with advice from the potential supervisor, instruction on how to use relevant sources of published information, carrying out a literature survey on the subject of the planned project; the writing of a literature review and project plan; and instruction in appropriate research and analysis methods. You'll be given instruction in risk and/or hazard assessment and the ethical and legal considerations of the work to be done.

Year three, core modules

  • Professional Issues: Computing and Society
    Understand the issues, opportunities and problems linked with computerisation of wide areas of human activity and the technical development and social effects of computer technology. You’ll focus on advanced computer reflective thinking in both computer science specialists and others, and development skills in professional values and approaches in the IT and computing fields. You’ll cover relevant and current topics in Computer Law (e.g. Data Protection; Intellectual Property Law; Computer Misuse) and other social, ethical and legal topics such as considering the causes and effects of systems failures (including but not limited to computer systems failure). You’ll also look at other aspects such as the ethical and professional responsibilities of graduates - particularly those from IT and computing disciplines.
  • Data Structures and Algorithms
    You’ll become aware of efficient programming practice by critically appraising some of the common data structures and algorithms available to the computer scientist. You’ll use a range of analysis techniques to carefully evaluate the performance of these data structures and algorithms in order that you may make prudent choices in the assembly of software artefacts with specific performance targets or constraints. The concept of the algorithm is a central pillar of computer science, and is closely related to the concept of the data structure: the storage mechanism that algorithms are used to manipulate. In this module, a variety of crucially important data structures and associated algorithms are explored, with frequent examples from real world applications. The importance of algorithm analysis, that is, the investigation of the efficiency and resource requirements of algorithms is presented, in order to develop an appreciation of implementation issues and choices faced in the design of non-trivial software projects. The concept of the abstract data type (ADT) is presented as an encapsulation of common data structures and algorithms that incorporates a simple interface, promotes a high-level of information hiding, and permits changes to underlying implementation without affecting the larger application. In comparison to earlier programming modules, the focus of Data Structures & Algorithms is firmly theoretical, setting a foundation for understanding concepts and techniques that are of vital importance to any computer scientist required to construct elegant and efficient software artefacts in any high-level programming language, including scripting languages. You’ll be assessed by an exam and a practical assignment with associated documentation.
  • Undergraduate Major Project
    You’ll create in a substantial piece of individual research and/or product development work, focused on a topic of your choice. You could chose your topic from a variety of sources including research groups, previous/current work experience, your current employer, a suggestion from your tutor or a topic you’re specifically interested in. You’ll identify problems and issues, conduct literature reviews, evaluate information, investigate and adopt suitable development methodologies, determine solutions, develop hardware, software and/or media artefacts as appropriate, process data, critically appraise and present your finding using a variety of media. Regular meetings with your project supervisor will ensure your project is closely monitored and steered in the right direction.


We’ll assess your progress from your written assignments, presentations, exams, major project, class and lab-based exercises and group project work. 

Where you'll study

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate. 

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Where can I study?

College of West Anglia
College of West Anglia

Study in the bustling market towns of King’s Lynn or Wisbech, or the historic city of Cambridge.

Explore College of West Anglia

Fees & funding

How do I pay my fees?

You can pay your fees in the following ways.

Tuition fee loan

Untitled Page

Most English undergraduates take out a tuition fee loan with Student Finance England. The fees are then paid directly to us. The amount you repay each month is linked to your salary and repayments start in April after you graduate.

How to apply for a tuition fee loan

Paying upfront

Untitled Page

If you choose not to take out a loan you can pay your fees directly to us. There are two ways to do this: either pay in full, or through a three- or six-month instalment plan starting at registration.

How to pay your fees directly

Untitled Page

Funding for UK & EU students

We offer most new undergraduate students funding to support their studies and university life. There’s also finance available for specific groups of students.

Grants and scholarships are available for:

Entry requirements


Entry requirements are not currently available, please try again later.

200 UCAS Tariff Points from a minimum of 2 A levels (or equivalent). 3 GCSEs at grade C or above, including English and Mathematics or Science

Untitled Page
Important additional notes

Our published entry requirements are a guide only and our decision will be based on your overall suitability for the course as well as whether you meet the minimum entry requirements. Other equivalent qualifications may be accepted for entry to this course, please email for further information.

All tariff points must come from A levels. Points from AS levels cannot be counted towards the total tariff points required for entry to this course.

Entry requirements are for September 2016 entry. Entry requirements for other intakes may differ.