Civil Engineering FdSc

Full-time undergraduate (2 years)

Chelmsford

January 2017, September 2016

code: H201

Available in Clearing 01245 686868


Overview

Work towards Engineering Technician (EngTech) status on our Joint Board of Moderators-accredited course. Mix vital theory with hands-on learning as you prepare for a successful career in civil engineering. When you graduate, you can go straight into work or do a top-up year to achieve an honours degree.

Untitled Page
Full description

Careers

Untitled Page

With your foundation degree you'll have career opportunities in areas such as design and production civil engineering.

You might find that you enjoy studying so much that you’d like to continue rather than going straight out to work. Graduating from this course means you’d only have to do one more year with us to achieve a full honours degree.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules

  • Geotechnics 1
    You’ll be introduced to Geotechnics, after the basic geological concepts, this module will provide you with an appreciation of the ground investigation element of site investigation. You’ll be introduced to soil laboratory practice and given the opportunity to relate the results of soil laboratory tests to theoretical concepts and the practical needs of civil engineering construction. Our module provides a medium for the development of skills in algebraic manipulation, which are applied to the relationships between basic soil properties.
  • Civil Engineering Works
    In this module we'll cover earthworks and groundwork techniques. You'll explore the principles and practice of earth-moving plant selection, safety, cycles and economics, soil stabilisation techniques of dynamic consolidation, vibratory systems and grouting. We'll also look at the foundations suitable for these systems. We'll look at conventional piled foundations, temporary and permanent support techniques including cofferdams, contiguous piling and diaphragm walls. You'll also explore long-span low-rise and medium rise structures, their material selection, construction methods, foundation types and the performance of different of claddings.
  • An Introduction to Technology and Design
    This module is designed for students of construction, surveying and architecture that have little or no prior knowledge of building construction, services and material properties. You’ll learn the common materials and methods of construction of both new and traditional housing, by considering each of the main elements of the buildings' structure. You’ll study the requirements of the internal environment, and build an understanding of how services installations contribute to user comfort. The personnel involved, health and safety requirements and specialised terminology is illustrated to develop your learning. You’ll also gain an insight into the behaviour and properties for a variety of materials commonly used in the construction of buildings and civil engineering projects, including their basic scientific principles. You’ll get an appreciation of the role of the designer in the construction process and have an understanding of the design process. You’ll learn through weekly videos, and workbooks as well as formal lectures and group tutorials.
  • Learning and Practical Skills Development (HE and Work)
    Foundation Degree students entering Higher Education will need specific study skills to enable them to maximise their learning potential and take advantage of opportunities available both in the academic setting and workplace. The module is intended to be both preparatory and supportive, building a strong foundation for learning and later development. You'll gain Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills for information management and presentation purposes and will be encouraged to use contemporary ICT methods for research and for the production and presentation of reports, in a style suitable both for university coursework requirements and the commercial environment. The module will enable you to gain experience in applying the elementary surveying techniques of levelling and linear measurement, both for detail acquisition and setting out. The relevant mathematical skills will be introduced and developed contextually. Final survey drawings will be produced and annotated. You will be introduced to basic 2D drafting techniques using a powerful set of tools. Skills in this medium are highly sought after in the construction industry. You'll develop and maintain a reflective learning log to support this module and their continuing studies, the reflective log to be used as the basis of your PDP submission.

Year two, core modules

  • Site and Engineering Surveying
    Discover both traditional and contemporary advanced survey techniques and capture, manipulate and utilise field data for both horizontal control and detail acquisition. You’ll gain experience in the theory and practice of traditional traversing and curve ranging techniques alongside contemporary practices. You’ll also gain hands on experience in advanced contemporary surveying equipment, such as theodolites and total stations, for data capture and for setting out. You’ll also gain an understanding of how remote surveying by extra-terrestrial systems has evolved and of how a variety of control systems relate to the Ordnance Survey National Grid. Finally, you’ll learn how to acquire data and sorted and processed it both manually and electronically to convert it into a format suitable for CAD output. You’ll produce and annotate your final survey drawings using AutoCAD 2006 and present them in a style appropriate to industry.
  • Structural Method and Analysis
    Gain an appreciation of the role of the designer in the construction process and get an understanding of the design process. You’ll address the fundamental relationship between loads, shear force and bending moment as well as the effect of combined shear and direct/bending stresses. We’ll introduce you to the deformability of structures and the principles of static indeterminacy and the methods of analysis of simple indeterminate forms. The design part of your module will be in three parts: Timber, Concrete and Steel Design. You’ll concentrate on basic design philosophies and procedures used in the design of structural elements in buildings constructed with these three most common building materials. You’ll link knowledge of structural forms, loading, structural analysis and materials behaviour and appreciate the importance of producing structural drawings of elements in sufficient details for construction and manufacture. You’ll cover the fundamentals of structural design for timber beams and floors; concrete beams, one-spanning concrete slabs and unrestrained steel beams. You’ll also cover strut or column design with axial, eccentric and biaxial loading for timber, concrete and steel and masonry walls and piers.
  • Work-Related Learning in the Built Environment
    Negotiate a structured set of specific objectives related to the world of work and take additional responsibility for your own learning. This will allow you to explore knowledge or interest in a work related field of the built environment which are not covered in our standard set of modules.

Optional modules available all years

  • CAD for Civil Engineers
    This module will give you an appreciation of the growing importance of three-dimensional CAD software. You'll get hands-on training in some of the most up-to-date software complying with the latest British and European Standards. We'll use intelligent object orientated design methods to create virtual models which can interact with digital terrain models. You'll get an appreciation of the substantial benefits such systems can offer in terms of client visualisation and design flexibility and learn to produce a basic site animation.
  • Concrete Technology
    This module will give you a thorough grounding in the principles and manufacture of concrete as a construction material. We'll provide you with a practical understanding of the factors, which influence the properties and durability from the design requirements to the finished product. You'll become conversant with various types of concrete in use and assess the importance of good quality control, compacting, placing and curing. We'll explain the nature and importance of a variety of additives and cement replacement materials used in modern concrete, and their effects on the fresh and hardened properties of concrete, to develop your ability to make or identify good quality concrete made with normal and recycled aggregates. Laboratory work will give you the practical experience of the theoretical concepts explained in the lectures.
  • Continuing Personal and Professional Development
    This module will enable you to understand your own need for continuous personal and professional development and understand and apply principles of evaluation, quality assurance and quality improvement leading to the evaluation and improvement of your own wider professional practice. You’ll also prepare a personal strategy for self-development. This will include identifying individual personal characteristics as a basis for a self-development programme that should include ideas about career development. A range of learning and teaching strategies are used which include workshops, seminars and tutorials. This module will enable you to focus on your individual development needs.
  • Group Project
    This module will develop your ability to evaluate and resolve practical problems and work as part of a design team. The module will help you apply the skills and knowledge developed in other modules of the course (and where possible, experiences from work) within a project that reflects the type of performance expected of construction technologists. It’s designed to bring small groups together into teams so you coordinate your individual skills and abilities. The scheme of work should allow you an opportunity to take responsibility for your own contribution to the outcome and to demonstration your ability to work as part of a team. The brief will include an agreed timescale for the staged development of the overall plan of work within defined constraints, with the team working towards an acceptable and viable solution to the brief. You’ll become conversant with the importance of good quality control, compacting, placing and curing will be assessed.
  • Hydraulics and Drainage
    This module covers the principles of hydrostatics and fluids in motion in pipes and open channels. Equations for calculation of pressures and forces on submerged and partially submerged objects are derived and applied. Continuity, energy and momentum equations are used to analyse uniform flow in pipes and open channels. The principle of flow in networks for water supply and surface water drainage is examined using simple models, whilst awareness is given of the availability of commercial computer models for more complex analysis. Laboratory sessions give you the opportunity to explore the limitations of the mathematical models of fluid behaviour. While the module concentrates on numerical techniques, you’ll be encouraged to consider that pipes and regularly shaped channels are not necessarily the ideal environmental solution.
  • Work-Based Learning (A) in Built Environment
    Understand general relationships between education and the world of work to demonstrate how each can provide a learning environment for the other, and to develop skills for your future career development. You’ll cover a minimum learning period of three months and explore a particular working environment which will be relevant to your present or future needs. You’ll examine how work and learning interact, manage self-learning, and increase employability by increasing self reliance and confidence. You’ll analyse and evaluate industrial structures, industrial roles and functions, and industrial self-awareness, as well as human relationships in industry, team relationships, problem evaluations and analysis. Finally, you’ll examine the links between academic theory and practical reality.
  • Work-Based Learning (B) in Built Environment
    Build on the work you covered in Work Based Learning A in Built Environment and continue to explore how work and learning interact. You’ll further analyse and evaluate industrial structures, industrial roles and functions, and industrial self-awareness. You’ll identify your likes, dislikes, successes, failures, strengths and weaknesses and review the opportunities and threats of professional membership. Following on from this, you’ll produce an action plan including an assessment of potential professional membership routes which will enable you to plan how and over what timescale you intend to improve your identified areas for development. You’ll make use of RAPID/PDP systems (knowledge and skills base) in providing evidence, which will be organised within a portfolio.

Assessment

Throughout the course, we’ll use a range of assessment methods to help measure your progress. Besides exams, you’ll be assessed on your project work, case studies, reports, workplace assessments, presentations and role-plays.

Where you'll study

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate. 

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Where can I study?

Chelmsford
Tindal Building on our Chelmsford campus

Our striking, modern campus sits by the riverside in Chelmsford's University and Innovation Quarter.

Explore our Chelmsford campus

Fees & funding

Course fees

UK & EU students, 2016/17 (per year)

£7,500

International students, 2016/17 (per year)

£11,000

Additional costs for Constructionarium

You will be asked to make a contribution of between £250 and £300 towards the cost of food and accommodation. You will also be asked to provide your own safety shoes or boots and warm outdoor clothing. Other personal protective equipment will be provided.

How do I pay my fees?

Tuition fee loan

Untitled Page

Most English undergraduates take out a tuition fee loan with Student Finance England. The fees are then paid directly to us. The amount you repay each month is linked to your salary and repayments start in April after you graduate.

How to apply for a tuition fee loan

Paying upfront

Untitled Page

If you choose not to take out a loan you can pay your fees directly to us. There are two ways to do this: either pay in full, or through a three- or six-month instalment plan starting at registration.

How to pay your fees directly

International students

You must pay your fees up-front, in full or in instalments. You will also be asked for a deposit or sponsorship letter for undergraduate courses. Details will be in your offer letter.

Paying your fees
Untitled Page

Funding for UK & EU students

We offer most new undergraduate students funding to support their studies and university life. There’s also finance available for specific groups of students.

Grants and scholarships are available for:

Untitled Page
Funding for international students

We've a number of scholarships, as well as some fee discounts for early payment.

Entry requirements

Loading...

Entry requirements are not currently available, please try again later.

Untitled Page

Important additional notes

Our published entry requirements are a guide only and our decision will be based on your overall suitability for the course as well as whether you meet the minimum entry requirements. Other equivalent qualifications may be accepted for entry to this course, please email answers@anglia.ac.uk for further information.

Entry requirements are for September 2016 entry. Entry requirements for other intakes may differ.

All tariff points must come from A levels. Points from AS levels cannot be counted towards the total tariff points required for entry to this course.

Untitled Page

We welcome applications from international and EU students. Please select one of the links below for English language and country-specific entry requirement information.

If you do not meet the above requirements, there is an alternative. Consider entry to the course via a foundation year at Cambridge Ruskin International College, an associate college of Anglia Ruskin which is on our Cambridge campus.

Similar courses that may interest you

Civil Engineering BSc (Hons)

Full-time undergraduate (3 years, 4 years with placement)

Chelmsford

January 2017, September 2016

Civil Engineering BEng (Hons)

Full-time undergraduate (3 years, 4 years with placement)

Chelmsford

January 2017, September 2016

Civil Engineering FdSc

Part-time undergraduate (3 years)

Chelmsford

January 2017, September 2016

Get more information

UK & EU applicants

01245 68 68 68

Enquire online

International applicants

+44 1245 68 68 68

Enquire online