International Hospitality and Tourism Management MSc

Postgraduate (12 months, 15 months full-time, part-time)

Cambridge

January 2017, September 2016

Full-time: January starts, 15 months. September starts, 12 months. Part-time: 24 months

Overview

Hospitality and tourism is an exciting and demanding international industry where you need specialist skills and knowledge to succeed. If you see yourself as a future leader, our specialist management course will give you the tools to achieve your goals. It includes a field trip and hands-on work placements.

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Full description

Careers

Our course is designed to make sure that you graduate with expert subject knowledge - but also with skills that are in demand by the international hospitality industry. These include soft skills such as customer handling, team working, communication and problem solving, as well as technical, practical or job-specific skills.

Modules & assessment

Core modules

  • Hospitality Management
    The majority of research undertaken into the internationalization of hotels has been focused on modal choice decisions or market entry strategy. However, a developing stream of research into how companies do business across borders is emerging; evaluating the strategic competencies and capabilities required for managing in the global hospitality industry. This module taps into this research stream with the aim of developing students into future corporate managers in international hospitality companies. The module looks at the hospitality industry at international and strategic levels. It is designed to identify the key strategic decisions facing senior managers of hospitality companies and evaluate alternative approaches to managing key decision areas of hospitality businesses. The aims of the module are to provide you with a range of perspectives for reviewing the strategic decisions taken by the international hospitality industry. The nature of the industry determines that this will be largely influenced by the actions of global and large companies. The module aims to consolidate your knowledge and understanding of the hospitality industry and to apply the learning from academic conceptual and empirical work to current developments amongst, in particular the global hospitality companies. The assessment for this module is a 3,000 word written assignment that asks you to evaluate some of the key issues currently impacting on international hospitality companies and the global environment in which they operate. You will learn about relevant management issues during the module and will be asked to identify, describe, and evaluate, those issues that you feel are most important. Your assignment should be firmly placed within the context of tourism and hospitality and should recognise the international dimension of the industries.
  • Services Marketing for Hospitality, Tourism and Events
    The aim of this module is to develop an understanding of marketing as a business philosophy, and of its important role within the tourism, hospitality and events sectors. This module will help students to appreciate, develop, and manage service marketing with a focus on the tourism, hospitality and event industry sectors. Tourism, hospitality and events differ from the majority of conventional business sectors in a number of ways. The module will first cover the key principles of marketing, then will focus on the specific characteristics of marketing for the service sector (specifically for tourism, hospitality and events). Students will learn how marketing managers can position their products or destinations to capture and retain customers. Topics include marketing as a business philosophy; services marketing planning and strategy; internal and external marketing environment analysis; consumer behaviour and marketing research; market segmentation; strategic positioning; integrated marketing communication (with a focus on on-line communication); distribution; sponsorship; and responsible marketing. The module is designed to provide students with theoretical knowledge, analytical skills and critical thinking, as well as with the practical know-how needed to make decisions in a professional context. The use of case studies, hands-on seminars and the involvement of marketing professionals in the delivery will contribute to the practical nature of this module. Student learning in this module will be assessed vie a written assignment. There will also be additional formative assessment activities throughout the semester.
  • Contemporary Issues in Tourism and Hospitality
    Tourism is a complex bundle of economic, political, socio-cultural and environmental processes that are non-devisable from each other or from many other related activities. As such tourism cannot be understood as an independent socio-economic phenomenon, or as made up of discrete localised events, but both shapes and is shaped by wider societal processes. This module focuses on some of the key issues in tourism that have emerged in recent years and the wider context of these issues. The module covers socio-economic, management, theoretical, and political aspects that have become key critical concerns and debates in tourism and travel in recent years. We review key trends in tourism and how these relate to aspects of wider global/local societal changes such as moves from Fordist to post-Fordist tourism organisation and products alongside the changing political economy and regulation of tourism. At the same time we critically review some of the main theoretical approaches to tourism from cultural, management, and geographical perspectives and their use in understanding key aspects of tourism - from recent reflections on the life cycles of destinations to theories of sustainable tourism, to actor-network theory, theories of mobilities and more. A series of critical issues in tourism will be used to illustrate the need for developing and testing theories in innovative ways. The module works as both an orientation module for those who have not studied tourism and also provides those who have studied or worked in tourism with a review of critical issues emerging in tourism, its potentialities and problems in the differing ways it can be researched, and how study of such issues can better aid tourism management. By the end of this module, students should have a good conceptual and practical understanding of the nature of cutting-edge tourism research and be able to analyse and evaluate the current state of knowledge in tourism. One of the main focuses for the design of this module has been the further development of relevant employability and professional skills.
  • Human Resource Issues in the Hospitality and Tourism Industry
    The hospitality and tourism industry is a people-intensive service industry. The sector is distinct in terms of its labour market and labour force compositions, requiring special attention to human resources management issues; potential employees and employers are required to assess this distinctive environment to allow them to adapt to the environment successfully and to adopt the most appropriate human resources management approaches effectively. This module provides you with the big picture of the hospitality employment from strategic and international perspectives. It also prepares you entering into your first graduate employment in the field by having a complete understanding of both views: as a potential employee and employer in the hospitality and tourism industry. This module aims to address key issues associated with human resource management in the hospitality and tourism sector. It will build on and synthesize knowledge and research on HR and its application in service industries in general and hospitality and tourism in particular. The aim is to equip you with the skills and understanding needed to manage the human resource in this service, people-intensive industry. The assessment for this module is a 3,000 word written critical evaluation of Human Resource Management issues in the context of both the tourism and hospitality industries. You will evaluate common issues identified during the module, and develop and recommend strategies companies can employ to deal with them.
  • Research Methods for Business and Management
    This module prepares students to undertake a piece of business or management research for their Masters project by developing appropriate knowledge, understanding and transferable intellectual and practical skills. Emphasis is placed on developing skills most likely to lead to a successful closure of a research journey set within any organisational setting identified by students in the role of either academic or practitioner researchers. Skills such as the ability to frame research aims, generate research questions/hypothesis, and research objectives, the ability to generate a conceptual framework, the ability to select and justify a particular research design and methodology and the ability to act as an ethical researcher so as not to spoil the field are all central features of this module. In addition the generation of core practical skills such as the ability to generate and analyse quantitative and qualitative data are central to this module. By developing this knowledge, understanding and transferable intellectual and practical skills the true aims of conducting research will be realised. Students will gain confidence in a range of cognitive and practical skills suitable to conducting research projects in a range of international business contexts so as to add to knowledge and understanding. One of the main focuses for the design of this module has been the further development of relevant employability and professional skills. Such skills are implicit in the learning outcomes. Multiculturalism has been considered during the design of this module and will be considered when the assessment brief is written.
  • Postgraduate Major Project
    This module support students in the preparation and submission of a Master stage project,Dissertation. For 60 credits this involves a length of 15,000 words. The major project enables you to demonstrate some or all of the following: - the ability to raise significant and meaningful questions in relation to your specialism; - depth of knowledge which may involve working at the current limits of theoretical and or research understanding; - critical understanding of method and its relationship to knowledge; - awareness of and ability to develop solutions to ethical dilemmas likely to arise in your research or professional practice; - the ability to draw meaningful and justifiable conclusions from information which may be complex or contradictory; - the capability to expand or redefine existing knowledge; to develop new approaches to changing situations; and contribute to the development of best practice; - the ability to communicate these processes in a clear and effective manner, as appropriate to the 'audience'; and - the capability to evaluate your work from the perspective of an autonomous reflective learner. One of the main focuses for the design of this module has been the further development of relevant employability and professional skills. Such skills are implicit in the learning outcomes. The project is developed in conjunction with a specified supervisor and must be in the area of study of the Masters course being undertaken. The Major Project should enable you to demonstrate the ability to explore important and relevant questions in the context of your specialist area. You should be able to explore detailed knowledge of the research area, demonstrating depth and/or breadth as appropriate; a critical understanding of appropriate methodologies and theories; the ability to present well-argued conclusions from a range of different sources, using material that may be complex and challenging, as appropriate. You should be able to recognise and propose solutions to issues raised in the course of research. You should be able to communicate your research in coherent terms, both orally and in writing, as required.

Optional modules

  • Strategic Management
    The module explores the core field of strategic management, and how strategy contributes to organisational performance. It focuses on your organisation's internal and external environment, and addresses key issues such as competitive advantage.
  • The Entrepreneurial Proposition
    You will have the opportunity to further develop themes related to the entrepreneurial individual, organisation and task environment, in order to develop a proposition which addresses an entrepreneurial opportunity. You will need to critically reflect upon the ways in which entrepreneurial processes and practices assist in moving from idea to action and the factors impinging upon entrepreneurial success and sustainability (e.g. personal and organisational growth and development). In so doing, you will critically assess how to design, develop and present solutions to different groups of stakeholders related to the entrepreneurial opportunity. This will be underpinned by an experiential teaching approach, where students apply concepts and frameworks to a real-life entrepreneurial opportunity which they have identified themselves. Achievement of learning outcomes will be assessed via a cognitive map and supporting written assignment and poster pitch.
  • Finance for Decision Making
    Management decision making is a complex subject involving many variable factors. This module explores the financial element contained in decisions and the techniques that may be used to assist informed management decisions. It is assumed that the student has already acquired a knowledge of financial vocabulary, the concepts behind basic financial terminology and the financial statements. The module begins by considering the availability of financial information that may be relevant to decision making and how this fits with that needed for the informed decision. This is further developed to the type of decision and differing requirements, leading to a more bespoke deliverable information set that meets the context of the decision. In order to fulfil the requirements identified as necessary for the informed decision the module explores the financial techniques developed by financial and management accountants and how they may be used and applied. Finally consideration is given to the relevance and weighting of the financial element in the decision making process and how qualitative issues may be incorporated in the overall decision. The link to corporate governance best practice is also explored. The module is designed to be contextualised for students from different organisations and sectors, and for it to be delivered to students without practical management experience. One of the main focuses for the design of this module has been the further development of relevant employability and professional skills. Such skills are implicit in the learning outcomes. The module will be assessed by two written assignments. The first assignment will encourage students to reflect upon the theory and techniques that underpin financial management practice while the following assignment will encourage students to consider how accounting can inform decision making within an organisation.
  • Operations Management
    Operations Management (OM) deals with the ways in which organisations transform multiple resources into services and products that markets and stakeholders' value. It is a vital area of competence for managers. OM is an under-exploited source of world class practice and competitive advantage for all types of organisation. Further, it is present in all departments wherein the strategic weapons of superior cost, quality, speed, flexibility, and dependability of delivery are applied. The module focuses on general management perspectives of medium-short term and day-to-day activities that are consistent with, and interdependent on, operational and corporate strategies. It reflects the cross-functional and cross-organisational approaches used by persistently successful managers. Key decision areas include operational design processes and standards, networks, facility, equipment and human capacities, logistics and purchasing, technology, quality management and evolving operational issues. The module is essentially practical in nature and gives students early opportunities for managing complex performance improvement projects based on persuasive evidence and strategy-related cost-benefits. One of the main focuses for the design of this module has been the further development of relevant employability and professional skills. Such skills are implicit in the learning outcomes. Multiculturalism has been considered during the design of this module and will be considered when the assessment brief is written.

Assessment

You'll be assessed individually and through group work. Assessment methods can include feedback in class discussion, evidence of research, project work based on case studies and work experience, case study evaluation and oral presentations. You’ll also need to display critical reflection in your Postgraduate Major Project.


This is a 12 or 15 month programme

Alongside your core modules you will pick a number of optional modules. Please note that modules are subject to change and availability.


Where you'll study

Your faculty

The Lord Ashcroft International Business School is one of the largest business schools in the East of England, with nearly 100 full-time teaching staff and approximately 6,000 students from more than 100 countries.

Our striking and award-winning business school building in Chelmsford, as well as new buildings in Cambridge, offer the most advanced learning technologies. We’re well-recognised for our centres of excellence by students, employers and professional bodies alike.

What makes us stand out is that our courses don't just give you sound academic knowledge – they’re at the cutting edge of current business practice and highly relevant to employers. This is owing to the close links we have with the business community and the partnerships we've developed with a wide variety of businesses and public service organisations. 

We're interested in people who are confident, ambitious and ready to take the challenge of making a difference in the world of business. If that's you, we'd love to hear from you.

Where can I study?

Cambridge
Lord Ashcroft Building on our Cambridge campus

Our campus is close to the centre of Cambridge, often described as the perfect student city.

Explore our Cambridge campus

Fees & funding

Course fees

UK & EU students, 2016/17 (per year)

£7,100

UK & EU students, 2016/17 (per year part time)

£3,550

International students, 2016/17 (per year)

£11,200

UK & EU students, 2017/18 (per year)

£8,100

UK & EU students, 2017/18 (per year part time)

£4,050

International students, 2017/18 (per year)

£11,900

Important fee notes

The part-time course fee assumes that you're studying at half the rate of a full-time student (50% intensity). Course fees will be different if you study over a longer period. All fees are for guidance purposes only.

How do I pay my fees?

Paying upfront

You won't need to pay fees until you've accepted an offer to attend, but you must pay your fees up-front, in full or in instalments.

How to pay your fees directly

International students

You must pay your fees up-front, in full or in instalments. You will also be asked for a deposit or sponsorship letter/financial guarantee. Details will be in your offer letter.

Paying your fees
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Funding for UK & EU students

It’s important to decide how to fund your course before applying. Use our funding guide for postgraduate students to learn more about the following:

  • The Government’s new £10k Masters loan
  • Applying for our scholarships
  • Additional funding options and support
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Funding for international students

We've a number of scholarships, as well as some fee discounts for early payment.

Entry requirements

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Important additional notes

Our published entry requirements are a guide only and our decision will be based on your overall suitability for the course as well as whether you meet the minimum entry requirements. Other equivalent qualifications may be accepted for entry to this course, please email answers@anglia.ac.uk for further information.

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International students

We welcome applications from international and EU students, and accept a range of international qualifications.

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English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you'll need to make sure you meet our English language requirements for postgraduate courses.

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Improving your English language skills

If you don't meet our English language requirements, we offer a range of courses which could help you achieve the level required for entry.

We also provide our own English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT) in the UK and overseas. To find out if we are planning to hold an ELPT in your country, contact our country managers.

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Get more information

UK & EU applicants

01245 68 68 68

Enquire online

International applicants

+44 1245 68 68 68

Enquire online