Osteopathy BOst

Part-time undergraduate (6 years)

The London School of Osteopathy

September 2017

Intermediate awards: BSc (Hons), CertHE, DipHE

Overview

Osteopathy offers an exciting career where you will be able to utilise a variety of therapeutic approaches and interventions in meeting the needs of patients. It’s a challenging field which requires listening, problem solving, and direct ‘hands-on’ interactions with patients. It takes six years of part-time attendance to enable you to become skilled autonomous practitioners, but is accessible both to those new to healthcare, and those wishing to extend and enhance their current career.

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Full description

Careers

The LSO osteopathy programmes enable students with no previous experience to transition to become fully-fledged independent practitioners in just 4 years (or 6 years by part-time study). Both pathways are accredited by the General Osteopathic Council and successful completion of the courses enables our graduates to apply to join the GOsC register. Legally only registered practitioners may practice osteopathy in the UK.

The LSO course will prepare you to be a good general osteopathic practitioner. There are many facets of osteopathy that you may choose to develop further as your career progresses. Examples include specialising in working with children or the elderly, or in sports and rehabilitation. Other career opportunities include teaching and research.

Most graduates choose to become self-employed, and value the flexibility this affords them in terms of working patterns. This can help support a healthy work / life balance. Earnings vary, with associates averaging £35K, and approximately 10% of osteopaths earning over £100K (figures from the Institute of Osteopathy Census 2014).

Modules & assessment

Level 4 modules

  • Osteopathy 1 - Acquisition
    This module aims to present an overview of osteopathy. It includes a consideration of the historical perspective of the evolution of osteopathic health care philosophy and practice. It introduces the professional and theoretical knowledge underpinning the practical skills necessary to engage in basic effective patient handling, positioning, gross articulation and the use of soft tissue techniques. It commences the journey of palpatory awareness, and incorporates observation as the starting point for the development of patient evaluation skills. Practical skill development, with an emphasis on practitioner safety and the sensitive care of the patient and the development of critical self-awareness, is initiated. This module acts as a focus for the integration of the theoretical knowledge of anatomy and physiology, as well as providing a framework for the continuing integration of knowledge and skills as an aspect of student self-directed learning within a clinic context. Assessment is via monitored activities during the year, as well as end of year written and practical assessments.
  • Osteopathy 2 - Understanding
    This module continues the osteopathic learning journey, moving from novice to advanced beginner in skill development. It will extend knowledge underpinning evaluation and diagnosis by introducing case history taking, and exploring various models of clinical reasoning and osteopathic structural concepts. The module aims to broaden appreciation of a student's growing professional identity as an osteopath, reflecting their personal values and beliefs, and setting this within the wider healthcare context. Tools to do this include insight into other healthcare paradigms, including sociology and psychology. Assessment is via monitored activities during the year, as well as end of year written and practical assessments.
  • Anatomy and Physiology - Head and Neck
    This foundation module provides an opportunity to learn about the intricate detail of the head and neck. It complements the module in neuro-anatomy and physiology. To contextualise the information, anthropological, evolutionary and embryological strands are woven in, complementing the more structured approach to regional and surface anatomy. Clinical scenarios may be used to highlight function from the perspective of dysfunction. Assessment is via a written exam at the end of semester one.
  • Anatomy and Physiology - Visceral
    This foundation module provides an opportunity to learn about the internal structure and function of the body, focussing in detail contents of the thorax and abdomen. To contextualise the information, anthropological, evolutionary and embryological strands are woven in, complementing the more structured approach to surface anatomy and analysis of physiological data. Clinical scenarios may be used to highlight function from the perspective of dysfunction. Assessment is via an essay and a written examination.
  • Anatomy and Physiology - Neuromusculoskeletal
    This key foundation module provides an opportunity to learn about the structure and function of the body, focussing in detail on the musculoskeletal system and peripheral nervous system. To contextualise the information, anthropological, evolutionary and embryological strands are woven in, complementing the more structured approach to surface anatomy and analysis of physiological data. Clinical scenarios may be used to highlight function from the perspective of dysfunction. Assessment is via a collaborative project, and an end of year written paper.

Level 5 modules

  • Osteopathy 3 - Analysis
    This module continues the student's osteopathic learning journey, moving from advanced beginner to competent practitioner in skill development. It will extend their knowledge underpinning evaluation and diagnosis with more in depth case history taking, and various models of clinical reasoning and osteopathic structural concepts. Two new approaches are initiated (functional & HVT), and treatment protocols considered. The module continues to foster a professional identity as an osteopath, reflecting the increasing experiential learning in the clinical context. Self awareness and criticality are integral to development. A written paper will allow exploration of propositional knowledge, whilst a video submission captures practical competence and provides opportunity for reflection. A practical completes the assessment profile.
  • Anatomy and Physiology - Neurology
    This module primarily focuses on neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, covering the CNS, ANS and the special senses. It incorporates the endocrine system, and the relationship between the two, incorporating immune and inflammatory responses. Various reflexes, stress, and pain, are explored in this context. It also extends the physiology syllabus from year 1, taking in the urinary and reproductive systems. To contextualise the information, anthropological, evolutionary and embryological strands are woven in, complementing the more systems based approach. Clinical scenarios may be used to highlight function from the perspective of dysfunction. An essay and a written exam comprise the assessment for this module.
  • Professional Studies - Yr 3
    This module brings together various scientific underpinning studies and clinical medicine, and puts them in the context of current osteopathic practice. Supporting studies include pharmacology, radiological diagnosis and imaging, laboratory testing, and first aid. These are brought together using clinical reasoning, and combined with osteopathic concepts and philosophy, to facilitate clinical practice. Awareness of one's own limitations and the relevance of clinical experience are brought together in the exploration of a critical incident. The module also aims to consider the vagaries and uncertainties implicit in osteopathic healthcare. Students may find this particularly challenging, as often there is no one 'correct' answer. Reasoned approaches and justified arguments will satisfy most of the specified learning outcomes. These arguments will be founded in osteopathic concepts. Assessment comprises a presentation and a restricted open book examination. The first aid session provides certification to the level of 'Appointed Person'.

Level 6 modules

  • Osteopathy 4 - Evaluation
    This module continues your osteopathic learning journey, moving from competent to proficient practitioner in some skill development, and from advanced beginner to competent in others. Your knowledge will be enhanced, and the challenge of finding solutions to novel situations tested in a supported environment. The focus of your effort becomes more patient centred, as your knowledge and skills develop. The module continues to foster your professional identity as an osteopath, reflecting your increasing experiential learning in the clinical context. Self awareness and criticality are integral to your development.
  • Professional Studies - Yr 4
    This module brings together various scientific underpinning studies and clinical medicine, and puts them in the context of current osteopathic practice. It continues the exploration of 'whole body' function initiated in Prof Studies 1. Supporting studies include sociology, psychology, naturopathy and nutrition. These are brought together using clinical reasoning, and combined with osteopathic concepts and philosophy, to facilitate clinical practice. Awareness of one's own limitations and the relevance of clinical experience are brought together in the presentation of a case study. Feedback and reports from the Clinic Tutors form an integral part of this module as well as 150 clinic hours. The third assessment format is an essay.
  • Professional Studies - Yr 5
    This module explores aspects of osteopathy which may be developed further with post graduate study. The topics cover most of the areas which may in time become 'specialist' areas within the profession. The intention is to provide the student with learning experiences which enable them to become well informed 'generalist' practitioners, and to know which areas they may wish to develop further via continuing professional development (CPD). Tutors are chosen on the basis of their specialist knowledge and clinical practice. 100 clinic hours are contained in this module. Assessment is via a presentation (the exact topic is chosen by the student); and by written papers, allowing a wide variety of potential patient presentations and situations to be explored.
  • Differential Diagnosis
    This module focuses on integration of pathology and clinical medicine with osteopathy. Specialist lecturers bring the interface between various health care professions into focus. This module deals with the scope and limitations of osteopaths, both as primary health care practitioners and complementary practitioners. A patient presentation from clinic will form the basis for a researched case study for assessment. An end of year written paper will allow an unfamiliar presentation to be explored.
  • Research and Criticality
    Part of this module is underpinned by a series of teaching sessions and tutorials that address the key areas of planning, designing and conducting a programme of research within an osteopathic context. Qualitative and quantitative methods of enquiry will be explored, focussing on methods relevant to health care research. Issues relating to consent, ethics and confidentiality will be covered. The culmination of the research element of the module is the Research Proposal, which forms the basis for the Dissertation module in the final year. The other part of this module focuses on student activities in clinic (50 clinic hours are embedded in this module). Students are supported in critically appraising their experiential learning, and developing personal learning plans. A framework of prescribed clinical activities underpins these activities, some of which are formally assessed on a pass/fail basis. Reflective activities (not confined to 4th year experiences) are captured and recorded along with the clinical activities and self-audit in an assessed portfolio.
  • Major Project
    The individual final project module allows you to engage in a substantial piece of individual research focused on a topic relevant to their studies. The project topic will have been assessed for suitability with discussions with an appropriate project supervisor to ensure sufficient academic challenge and research feasibility. The project may be in the form of primary research (e.g. laboratory, human or questionnaire-based data, clinical service evaluation, clinical placement, or other relevant acceptable sources), OR in the form of an extended literature review. The chosen topic will require you to identify/formulate problems and issues, conduct literature reviews, evaluate information, investigate using suitable methodologies, process and analyse data, critically analyse, appraise and present findings using suitable methods or media. Regular meetings/contact with the project supervisor will take place, so that the project is closely monitored and steered in the right direction. Formative assessment is an individual presentation of the research topic, methodology undertaken (and any data acquired) in week 6/7. This will assist in a ‘feed-forward’ manner in the development of the final Summative assessment would normally include a substantial written project report.
  • Portfolio - Yr 5
    This module represents the culmination of the student's learning journey, from novice to autonomous practitioner. Not only does it provide an opportunity to reflect upon progress made, and critically appraise current practice against external benchmarks, but it provides a solid platform from which students will undertake Continuing Professional Development (CPD). The model of lifelong learning is embedded in the portfolio. Activities are also undertaken to prepare the student for independent practice. 150 clinic hours are contained in this module. Assessment is via submission of a semi-structured portfolio.
  • Osteopathy 5a: Pre-Autonomy
    This module continues the osteopathic learning journey, moving from competent to proficient practitioner in skill development and level of clinical reasoning. The module continues to foster a professional identity as an osteopath, reflecting the increasing experiential learning in the clinical context. Self awareness and criticality are integral and essential to development. Students will be acting as senior students in clinic, with increasing levels of autonomy. Supporting and guiding junior students embeds and enhances a student's own understanding. Assessment by Clinic Tutors is integral to this module. The final clinical assessment is conducted with real patients and monitored by External Osteopathic Examiners (as required by the GOsC). 150 clinic hours are contained in this module.
  • Osteopathy 5b: Autonomy
    This module continues the osteopathic learning journey, moving from competent to proficient practitioner in skill development and level of clinical reasoning. The module continues to foster a professional identity as an osteopath, reflecting the increasing experiential learning in the clinical context. Self awareness and criticality are integral and essential to development. Students will be acting as senior students in clinic, with increasing levels of autonomy. Supporting and guiding junior students embeds and enhances a student’s own understanding. Assessment by Clinic Tutors is integral to this module. The final clinical assessment is conducted with real patients and monitored by External Osteopathic Examiners (as required by the GOsC). 75 clinic hours are contained in this module.

Assessment

Assessment requirements drive student motivation, effort and commitment in any course but especially those with a professional focus. The LSO assessment programme provides a balance between formative and summative assessment items reflecting the need to provide students with feedback about their grasp and eventual mastery of necessary theoretical knowledge, attitudinal aspects of professionalism and practical skills.

A wide range of forms of assessment are used throughout the programme to support the variety of learning outcomes to be measured (and also reflecting different strengths & learning styles within the student community). Continuous assessment in practical classes is used both formatively and summatively in the early stages of the course. Practical exams and vivas are held every year, with real patients involved in the final exams (as required by the GOsC). Video assignments, critiques, case studies, presentations, and portfolio activities all add to the body of evidence for student progression & achievement.

A research project is planned, conducted, written up and submitted in the final stages of the course.

A total of 1,200 hours of clinic exposure enable experiential learning to bring the theoretical class based sessions to life. Competence based tasks are embedded throughout this journey.

This is a six year programme

Please note that you will need to complete all of the above core modules. This course does not have any optional modules. Modules are subject to change and availability.

Where you'll study

Your faculty

The Faculty of Medical Science, opened in 2014, is founded on the strong international reputation of our flagship Postgraduate Medical Institute. Based on our riverside campus in Chelmsford and Young Street campus in Cambridge, we deliver innovative and clinically relevant teaching and research across two departments:

  • Department of Allied and Public Health
  • Department of Medicine and Healthcare Science.

Thanks to our close relationships with the major clinical-care providers in the east of England, there are significant opportunities for collaboration and student placements across a variety of clinical sites.

We offer exciting opportunities for research and education in the allied health professions. We also translate science and epidemiology into health education and primary care, and deliver taught Master’s programmes to qualified medics. We have a flourishing community of PhD and MD(Res) students across all of our research fields.

Our advanced learning facilities include state-of-the-art clinical skills laboratories and simulation suites, which mirror real-life clinical situations. We also have a fantastic, modern library and a wide range of science labs and ICT suites.

Where can I study?

Academic teaching (lectures, practical classes, tutorials etc) takes place at The Grange in Bermondsey in south east London (just 10 minutes' walk from Tower Bridge). Clinical experience is gained through our very busy student-run out-patient clinic in Bethnal Green.

Fees & funding

Course fees

UK & EU students, 2017/18 (per year, part time)

£4,625

How do I pay my fees?

You can pay your fees in the following ways.

Tuition fee loan

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Most English undergraduates take out a tuition fee loan with Student Finance England. The fees are then paid directly to us. The amount you repay each month is linked to your salary and repayments start in April after you graduate.

How to apply for a tuition fee loan

Paying upfront

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If you choose not to take out a loan you can pay your fees directly to us. There are two ways to do this: either pay in full, or through a three- or six-month instalment plan starting at registration.

How to pay your fees directly

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Funding for UK & EU students

We offer most new undergraduate students funding to support their studies and university life. There’s also finance available for specific groups of students.

Grants and scholarships are available for:

Entry requirements

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Main

Those wishing to enter the course will require: UCAS Points 104 from 2 preferably 3 A's. Levels with one being a science subject (e.g. Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Psychology), and GCSE's to include English and Maths grade C minimum.

Applicants whose first language is not English and whose professional or academic qualifications were not taught and assessed in English will be required to demonstrate the University standard of English language (IELTS) at Level 6.5 (including written English academic test) prior to commencement on the course.

In addition to the above, applicants must demonstrate aptitude in learning practical skills and conduct themselves in a manner commensurate with a health care practitioner. They must be willing to undergo an Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check, and be in a state of health which will not preclude them working with members of the public.

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Important additional notes

Our published entry requirements are a guide only and our decision will be based on your overall suitability for the course as well as whether you meet the minimum entry requirements. Other equivalent qualifications may be accepted for entry to this course, please email answers@anglia.ac.uk for further information.

We don't accept AS level qualifications on their own for entry to our undergraduate degree courses. However for some degree courses a small number of tariff points from AS levels are accepted as long as they're combined with tariff points from A levels or other equivalent level 3 qualifications in other subjects.

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English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you'll need to make sure you meet our English language requirements for undergraduate courses.

UCAS Tariff calculator - 2017 entry

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