Dr Richard Piech

Senior Lecturer

Faculty:Faculty of Science & Technology

Department:Psychology

Location: Cambridge

Areas of Expertise: Brain & Cognition

Richard is a Senior Lecturer in our Department of Psychology. He holds an MSc and PhD, and his research focuses on affective neuroscience.

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richard.piech@anglia.ac.uk

Research interests

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Richard is interested in affective neuroscience. Within that, his research projects address questions from the following fields.

  • Decision making and well-being: which factors influence choices in an uncertain environment, and can these factors be utilized to optimize choice?
  • Emotional processing: what characterizes emotional influences on cognition, and how are they achieved in the brain?
  • Motivation: what underlies 'wanting' things like food and drugs?
  • Social neuroscience: how does the brain facilitate learning from the experiences of others?

Richard is a member of the following research areas.

These form part of our Brain and Cognition Research Group. Richard is also a member of our Emotion and Well-Being Research Area which forms part of our Applied, Social and Health Psychology Research Group.

Find out more about our Psychology PhD.

Qualifications

  • MSc
  • PhD

Selected recent publications

Kerskens, C.M., Piech, R.M. and Meaney, J.F.M., 2012. Imaging Blood Circulation Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In: Leahy, M.J. (Ed.). Microcirculation Imaging. Weinheim: Wiley-Blackwell.

Piech, R.M., McHugo, M., Smith, S.D., Dukic, M.S., Van Der Meer, J., Abou-Khalil, B., Most, S.B. and Zald, D.H., 2011. Attentional capture by emotional stimuli is preserved in patients with amygdala lesions. Neuropschologia, 49(12), pp.3314-19.

Piech, R.M., McHugo, M., Smith, S.D., Dukic, M.S., Van Der Meer, J., Abou-Khalil, B., Zald, D.H., 2010. Fear-enhanced visual search persists after amygdala lesions. Neuropsychologia, 48(12), pp.3430-3435.

Piech, R.M., Pastorino, M.T., and Zald, D.H., 2010. All I saw was the cake: Hunger effects on attentional capture by visual food cues. Appetite, 54, pp.579-582.