Dr Charlotte Paddison

Senior Lecturer

Faculty:Faculty of Science & Technology

Department:Psychology

Location: Cambridge

Areas of Expertise: Applied, Social and Health Psychology

Dr Paddison is a health psychologist and her research focuses on the experience of illness, treatment, and health care.

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charlotte.paddison@anglia.ac.uk
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Background

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Charlotte joined Anglia Ruskin University as a Senior Lecturer in 2015, after eight years at the University of Cambridge. Her previous experience includes five years as a Senior Research Associate in the Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research and, prior to that, an ESRC post-doctoral fellowship in behavioural science analysing data from the Wellcome Trust-funded ADDITION study. She completed her PhD in Psychology at Massey University, New Zealand.

Charlotte has published in leading social science and clinical journals including the BMJ (2009, 2013), Diabetes Care (2015), and the American Journal of Kidney Disease (2012); she is a named investigator on funded grants totalling £2.2 million (NIHR; ESRC; British Heart Foundation/Stroke Association; Diabetes UK).

Charlotte leads the Health Psychology research group in the Department of Psychology at Anglia Ruskin. She is also a visiting senior research associate at the Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge. Her recent work on the wellbeing of informal carers won a prestigious national award from the Royal College of General Practitioners (Public Health & Health Services Delivery Paper of the Year, 2016).  You can hear Dr Paddison speaking about why the health and health care experiences of informal carers need to become a priority for health policy and clinicians here, or read a blog about the paper here.

Research interests

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Charlotte welcomes enquires regarding research collaboration and requests for PhD supervision. Her current interests focus on:

  • Use of medicines, including novel biomedical treatments
  • Psychological perspectives on the benefits and harms of treatment
  • Multimorbidity
  • Experience of chronic illness, particularly diabetes
  • Patient experience of health services
  • The psychology of medicine

Questions of research interest include: What are the psychological benefits and harms of a polypill? How can we improve care for people with multimorbidity? How do people with diabetes describe their primary care experiences? What is overtreatment, and who decides?

In addition to expertise in health psychology, Charlotte has strong interests in health services research, primary care, public health, and ageing.

Charlotte is also a member of our Health Psychology Research Area which forms part of our Applied, Social and Health Psychology Research Group.

Areas of research supervision

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  • First supervisor of Samantha McMillan (PhD topic: Understanding and optimising the use of medicines, Anglia Ruskin University)
  • Currently co-supervisor for James Jamison (Behavioural impacts of a polypill, University of Cambridge)

Find out more about our Psychology PhD.

Memberships, editorial boards

  • British Psychological Society (Graduate Member of the Division of Health Psychology and UK Chartered Health Psychologist)
  • Economic and Social Research Council Peer Review College member
  • International Society of Behavioural Medicine; European Health Psychology Society
  • International Society of Critical Health Psychology

Research grants, consultancy, knowledge exchange

Charlotte is a named investigator on funded grants totalling £2.2 million (funders: NIHR; ESRC; British Heart Foundation/Stroke Association; Diabetes UK).  She has also held four small grants as Principal Investigator, most recently from Diabetes UK (£42,856) on the primary care experiences of people with Diabetes in England (published in Diabetes Care, 2015).

Charlotte has collaborated successfully with senior statisticians at the RAND Corporation (US) and RAND Europe, in addition to professors in behavioural science, health services research, and primary care at the University of Cambridge. Enquiries about future collaboration are welcome.

Charlotte's research has been used to inform health policy at a national level in both the UK and in New Zealand. Her recommendations are included in the national (2014) New Zealand Guidelines on the Management of Diabetes, and measures she developed in her doctoral work have also been used in international studies (MILES, Australia and Europe). In the UK her research investigating the psychological harms of diabetes screening, published in the BMJ (Paddison et al, 2009), was awarded the Novo Nordisk Scientific Award for best new paper psychosocial aspects of diabetes in a Europe-wide competition (2010).

Charlotte has given more than 50 oral papers at national and international conferences. She was awarded best paper by the PsychoSocial Aspects of Diabetes study group (2010); best poster at the Australian Diabetes Conference (2006). Her student (Dr Gwilym Thomas) award a plenary presentation and best medical student paper at the 2014 Society for Academic Primary Care meeting (Madingley).

Reviewer for major grant schemes (eg NIHR; ESRC; Diabetes UK); approximately 20 national and international journals (eg Health Psychology; Annals of Family Medicine); UK and international conferences (eg UK Society for Behavioural Medicine, AcademyHealth); and doctoral thesis examiner (Massey University).

Selected recent publications

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Burt, J., Abel, G., Elmore, N., Newbould, J. Davey, A., Llanwarne N., Maramba, I., Paddison, C., Benson, J., Silverman, J., Elliott, M.N., Campbell, J. and Roland, M., 2016. Rating communication in GP consultations: The association between ratings made by patients and trained clinical raters.  Medical Care Research and Review  Full text here

Paddison, C.A., 2016. Moral distress amongst physician trainees: reflections on the emotional sanitization of medicine. J Gen Intern Med 31: 462 PubMed.  Full text here.

Thomas, G.P., Saunders, C.L., Roland, M.O. and Paddison, C.A., 2015. Informal carers' health-related quality of life and patient experience in primary care: evidence from 195,364 carers in England responding to a national survey. BMC Fam Pract 16: 62 PubMedFull text here.

Paddison, C.A., Saunders, C.L., Abel, G.A., Payne, R.A., Campbell, J.L. and Roland, M., 2015. Why do patients with multimorbidity in England report worse experiences in primary care? Evidence from the General Practice Patient Survey. BMJ Open 5: e006172 PubMed. Full text here.

Simmons, D., Prevost, A.T., Bunn, C., Holman, D., Parker, R.A., Cohn, S., Donald, S., Paddison, C.A., Ward, C., Robins, P. and Graffy, J., 2015. Impact of community based peer support in type 2 diabetes: a cluster randomised controlled trial of individual and/or group approaches. PLoS ONE 10: e0120277 PubMedFull text here.

Paddison, C., 2015. How can we get better at providing patient centred care: does continuity matter? BMJ 350: h1127 PubMedFull text here.

Paddison, C.A., Saunders, C.L., Abel, G.A., Payne, R.A., Adler, A.I., Graffy, J.P. and Roland, M.O., 2015. How do people with diabetes describe their experiences in primary care? Evidence from 85,760 patients with self-reported diabetes from the English General Practice Patient Survey. Diabetes Care 38: 469-75 PubMedFull text here.

Paddison, C.A.M., Saunders, C.L., Abel., G.A., Payne, R.A., Campbell, J. and Roland, M.O., 2015. Why do patients with multimorbidity in England report worse experiences in primary care compared to those with single conditions? BMJ Open, 5:e006172 doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006172. Full text here.

Thomas, G.P.A., Saunders, C.L., Roland, M.O. and Paddison, C.A.M., 2015. How do informal caregivers describe their health-related quality of life and experiences in primary care? Evidence from 195,364 caregivers in England responding to a national survey. BMC Family Practice, 16(62), doi:10.1186/s12875-015-0277-y. Full text here.

Paddison, C.A.M., Saunders, C.L., Abel., G.A., Payne, R.A., Adler, A.I., Graffy, J.P. and Roland, M.O., 2015. How do people with diabetes describe their experiences in primary care? Evidence from 85,760 patients with self-reported diabetes from the English General Practice Patient Survey. Diabetes Care, 38(3), pp.469-475.

Roland, M., Paddison C.A.M. (2013). Better management of patients with multimorbidity. BMJ, 2013;346:f2510, doi: 10.1136/bmj.f2510. Full text here.

Paddison, C. A., Elliott, M. N., Haviland, A. M., Farley, D. O., Lyratzopoulos, G., Hambarsoomian, K. and Roland, M.O., 2012. Experiences of Care Among Medicare Beneficiaries With ESRD: Medicare Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) Survey Results. American Journal of Kidney Disease, doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2012.10.009. Full text here.

Paddison, C.A.M., Eborall, H., French, D.P., Kinmonth, A.L., Prevost, A.T., Griffin, S.J. and Sutton, S., 2011. Predictors of anxiety and depression among people attending diabetes screening: A prospective cohort study in the ADDITION (Cambridge) trial. British Journal of Health Psychology, 16, pp.213-226. Full text here.

Paddison, C.A.M., Eborall, H., Sutton, S., French, D.P., Vasconcelos, J., Prevost, A.T., Kinmonth, A.L. and Griffin, S.J., 2009. Are people with negative screening tests for diabetes falsely reassured? A parallel group cohort study embedded in the ADDITION (Cambridge) randomised controlled trial. BMJ, 2009; 339: b4535. Full text here.