Criminal Justice and Social Inclusion

The effectiveness of support services for female offenders with drug or alcohol issues, 2009 (Stephen Moore and Alex Collis)

This research was carried out in 2009 for the Norfolk Drug and Alcohol Action Team (DAAT). The research involved tracking down and interviewing female offenders who had recently or were currently serving sentences and had drug and/or alcohol dependency. The women were interviewed to obtain their perceptions of the services provided to them and to find the obstacles that they encountered in accessing the services. Their views were then contrasted with the perceptions of professionals engaged in service provision. The results were provided in a report to the Norfolk Drug and Alcohol Action Team and are available on the Norfolk County Council Website. The research concluded that there were noticeable differences in how the different professions perceive their work and its effectiveness. It also found differences between the female clients' perceptions of the organisation of services from those of the professionals


Voluntary Work by Faith Groups with Offenders in the East of England, 2009 (Stephen Moore and Alex Collis)

This research was commissioned by the East of England Faiths Council who wished to find out the amount and the effectiveness of voluntary work with current and ex-offenders undertaken by Faith Groups in the East of England. The research was carried out in 2009. The research involved mapping the various initiatives in the East of England, interviewing the local organisers and collating any written evidence that they held on the effectiveness of their interventions. The research concluded that there were many valuable initiatives, but they were generally too limited in scope and too fragmented, relying on a limited number of enthusiastic volunteers.


Cost/Benefit Analysis of the CRSP Project, Bedford Prison, 2010 (Stephen Moore and Alex Collis)

This research was commissioned by The East of England Faiths Council and is related to the earlier work on voluntary groups in the East of England. The CRSP is a Third Sector Organisation which has received government funding to work with offenders immediately upon their release from Bedford Prison. The research is running throughout 2010. The project uses volunteers to 'befriend' ex-offenders in the difficult period of readjustment during their initial release into the community. Using innovative methods the research seeks to provide a cost/benefit analysis of the work of the project. The aim is to see whether small voluntary organisations can demonstrate a positive economic benefit to the criminal justice system. The work involves collating data, working out costs and potential benefits from the interventions and relating these to more intangible social benefits.


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