Welcome to Your Tape

6 December 2017, 15:30 - 17:00
Cambridge campus

A speech bubble formed by newspaper cut outs

Speaker: Dr Tanya Horeck

Earning itself the accolade of ‘most tweeted television programme of 2017’, Netflix’s dramatic series 13 Reasons Why, based on the 2007 young adult novel by Jay Asher, generated global controversy over its graphic depiction of suicide. In the weeks following its full drop release by Netflix on March 31st, 2017, a full-blown moral panic over the series emerged, with one Canadian school forbidding all discussion of the drama, and New Zealand banning under-18s from watching it without an adult present, for fear of potential copycat suicides. Simmering beneath the cultural hysteria over 13 Reasons Why, is an underlying concern regarding the activity of unbridled consumption through binge watching. Earning itself the accolade of ‘most tweeted television programme of 2017’, Netflix’s dramatic series 13 Reasons Why, based on the 2007 young adult novel by Jay Asher, generated global controversy over its graphic depiction of suicide. In the weeks following its full drop release by Netflix on March 31st, 2017, a full-blown moral panic over the series emerged, with one Canadian school forbidding all discussion of the drama, and New Zealand banning under-18s from watching it without an adult present, for fear of potential copycat suicides. Simmering beneath the cultural hysteria over 13 Reasons Why, is an underlying concern regarding the activity of unbridled consumption through binge watching. In the warning issued over the series by the National Association of School Psychologists in the US, for example, it was noted that ‘many teenagers are binge watching without adult guidance and support’, which could ‘lead impressionable viewers to romanticize the choices made by the characters and/or develop revenge fantasies’ (’13 Reasons Why’). While it is true, as scholars such as William Proctor have argued, that the ‘media effects’ language being used to heap moral approbation on 13 Reasons Why is problematic, this paper argues that it is nonetheless important to critically interrogate the relationship between the programme’s mode of consumption and its graphic depiction of sexual assault, slut shaming, image-based violence, and suicide. How does the Netflix modus operandi of designing shows to be binged.

Event Details

When:
6 December 2017, 15:30 - 17:00
Location:
Cambridge campus
Room:
LAB 109 (Harvard)
Cost:
FREE
Booking:

No booking is required for this event.